Gabriel's Rebellion: The Virginia Slave Conspiracies of 1800 and 1802

By Douglas R. Egerton | Go to book overview

7
A Companion Picture

As Norfolk authorities took Gabriel to Richmond, the trials of his followers continued in the special courts of oyer and terminer in a number of counties. Slaves were tried in the county of their arrest, not in that of their master's residence; a number of those already tried in the Henrico tribunal, including young Ben Woolfolk, belonged to Caroline or Hanover slaveholders. As the far-flung conspiracy collapsed, rebels across the state were brought before the dock in several different towns and hamlets.

Strangely enough, some of the trials were separated from Henrico only by arbitrary lines of jurisdiction. Richmond City County had been carved out of Henrico, but the city still conducted its legal business in the old building on Twenty-second Street (which both municipalities shared with the Virginia's Supreme Court of Appeals). In normal times the state's justice was a sleepy enough affair, and the multiple use of the courthouse posed few problems. But in the hectic days of September, the Richmond justices waited impatiently for the Henrico magistrates to pause in their deliberations. On Thursday, September 25, such a break occurred. The Richmond magistrates, led by Mayor James McClurg, bustled into the temporarily empty chamber and shouted for King to be brought before them. Despite overwhelming evidence against him--both Ben Woolfolk, who had first recruited him, and Mary Martin, the shopkeeper who had heard King talk of fighting on after the rebellion collapsed, testified for the prosecution--his owner, Philip A. Nicholas, wished to retain the venerable rebel. Nicholas testified in King's behalf and even hired an expensive lawyer to conduct his defense. The justices, however, remained unimpressed and sentenced King to die with the other rebels on October 3. Still Nicholas persisted. His friend Larkin Stanard wrote in King's behalf to the governor, who was by now ready to embrace any argument that would spare a minor conspirator. "I always thought him to be much attach'd to his master," Larkin insisted, "Tho subject to drink. [And when in a State of Intoxication would say things I do not believe he thought of when sober." That was good enough for Monroe, who decided to split the difference. King got his pardon but not his freedom. Until the governor could decide

-95-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Gabriel's Rebellion: The Virginia Slave Conspiracies of 1800 and 1802
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • I- Richmond 1800 1
  • 1- The Revolutionary Storm 3
  • 2- An Upright Man 18
  • 3- The Year 1800 34
  • 4- The Preparation 50
  • 5- A Plot Discovered 69
  • 7- A Companion Picture 95
  • II- Halifax 1802 117
  • 8- Recalled to Life 119
  • 9- The Footsteps Die out 132
  • 10- A Place of Asylum 147
  • 11- The Power in That Name 163
  • Appendix 1- Gabriel''s Religion 179
  • Appendix 2- The Frenchmen 182
  • Appendix 3- Virginia Slaves Executed in 1800 and 1802 186
  • Notes 189
  • Bibliography 237
  • Index 253
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 260

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.