The Founder: Cecil Rhodes and the Pursuit of Power

By Robert I. Rotberg; Miles F. Shore | Go to book overview

23
"Sex Enters into Great Matters of State" Of Dreams and Deeds

RHODES WAS both a dreamer and a doer. To the end of his days the Founder never ceased asking "what if . . .?" and then seeking practical, entrepreneurial answers to questions both profound and mundane. He did so despite increasing concerns about the ability of his body to endure the uncommon strains placed upon it by both stress and physical deterioration, and despite the repeated pains that came from his heart and the "fevers" which sent him so often to bed. Refusing until near the end to slow down or to succumb to this most unsquarable of enemies, Rhodes set his usual fast and varied pace, imagining, conceptualizing, delegating, and nagging by telegraph. He sought new economic opportunities and to promote and further those which had already been initiated. His energy levels remained astonishingly high almost to the end, and so too did his ability to translate even the most seemingly far-fetched ideas into accomplishment.

In addition to his hitherto little-acknowledged heavy involvement in the political transformation of the Cape both before and during the Anglo-Boer War, Rhodes propelled his telegraph and his rails toward Cairo and toward more directly realizable but still challenging goals like Ujiji and the Victoria Falls. He presided over the emergence of settler Southern Rhodesia, and encouraged and assisted its development. He directed the occupation and initial administration of Northern Rhodesia. He continued to guide De Beers and the diamond industry (as well as the British South Africa Company), and never simply sat back and counted his growing wealth. Nor did he resort to the narcissistic exercise of erecting empty monuments to his own genius. Instead, his active brain fostered a stream of new projects, both in the Cape and in the north, which were to lead to industries of benefit to South Africa and the Rhodesias. He traveled the world and thought and planned constantly for an empire which comparatively soon would be deprived of his guiding gifts. 1

-638-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Founder: Cecil Rhodes and the Pursuit of Power
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 804

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.