Harry S. Truman: The Man from Independence

By William F. Levantrosser | Go to book overview

Truman also evidenced his concern for improving social services by his fiscal initiatives. In his first "budget" as Presiding Judge he increased the indigent widows' account 20 percent, from $15,000 to $18,000 and for dependent children 60 percent, from $12,000 to $20,000. 44 Through his two terms as Presiding Judge he steadily increased county activities in social services. Incidentally, his increases came well before the economic collapse of the Great Depression and the rapid failure of many private relief agencies. When he entered the court in 1923 the cost of care for the county's indigent dependents was $550,000, by 1930 it was already over one million dollars. 45

During his years as Presiding Judge, Harry Truman grew and matured as an energetic, creative, bold progressive reformer. He developed into an astute political leader, intelligent in discerning structural impediments in the jelly-rigged governmental organizations and knowledgeable enough to seek out and identify new models and new functional organizations to cope with a rapidly evolving world. When he left Jackson County in 1934 the county government was deeply marked by his brief presence.


NOTES
1.
These points are detailed at length in the author's forthcoming manuscript: Harry S. Truman: The County Years.
2.
To date there exists no adequate narrative on Truman's first fifty years; Jonathan Daniels , The Man of Independence ( Philadelphia, 1950) remains the sole work substantially addressing the early period of his life. Cabell Phillips, The Truman Presidency ( Baltimore, 1966) has eighteen pages on Truman before the Senate; Bert Cochran, Harry Truman and the Crisis Presidency ( New York, 1973) has forty-six pages on his first fifty years, and Robert Donovan Conflict and Crisis ( New York, 1977) has nothing on the pre-Senate years. The most recent work, and the only one advertised as a "full biography," is Harold Gosnell Truman's Crisis (Westport, Conn., 1980). While that book has ninety-five pages on Truman's early life it is almost totally devoid of new scholarship; the chapters on the early county years are based overwhelmingly upon dated, secondary sources.
3.
Richard S. Childs, "Ramshackle County Government," Outlook 113 ( May 3, 1916), 44-45. H. S. Gilbertson, The County: The Dark Continent of American Politics, ( New York, 1917); William L. Bradshaw, "The Missouri Count Court: A Study of the Organization and Function of the County Board of Supervisors in Missouri", The University of Missouri Studies 6 ( April 1, 1931); "Steps Toward Improved County Government", Public Affairs, March 31, 1927, Kansas City Public Service Institute.
4.
"Disjointed County Government", Public Affairs, March 10, 1927, Kansas City Public Service Institute.
5.
Bradshaw, "The Missouri County Court," pp. 29, 41.
6.
Minutes-Local Government Committee, Kansas City Chamber of Commerce, March 24, 1927.
7.
In Truman's first election in 1922 the local ballot had sixty-two names on the Democratic ticket alone. The voter selected candidates from the State Superintendent of Public Schools to the constable force in each of the seven townships. The constitutional

-297-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Harry S. Truman: The Man from Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.