Paying the Premium: A Military Insurance Policy for Peace and Freedom

By Walter Hahn; H. Joachim Maitre | Go to book overview
should create offices with specific responsibility for industrial preparedness planning. "War-stoppers" should be identified, resources provided, and the needed planning with industry undertaken to ensure the capability for sustained surge production of critical warfighting materiel.
The Department of Defense should take the lead in monitoring the health of defense industries, raising the warning flag when problems are discerned, so that appropriate remedies can be designed and acted upon in time. An overall strategic plan should be developed in this behest.
The Department of Defense should make the requirements of the defense industrial base, including post-production support and surge considerations, an integral part of the acquisition process.
The Department of Defense should consider reinstating the Manufacturing Board, Manufacturing Strategy Committee, and Production Base Advocate to strengthen support to and communication with the defense industrial base.
In general, policies should be weighed for their encouragement of modernization, technology investment, and other initiatives, to enhance the competitiveness of the U.S. industrial base with its counterparts abroad.
The Department of Defense should assume an active leadership role in quality management and strive to remove "non-value-added" requirements and other impediments that stifle industry's quest for greater quality of its products. This is an indispensable step toward restoring a more general sense of cooperative partnership in government- industry relations and dispelling the confrontational climate that is all too much in evidence today.

It may be argued that these recommendations amount to mere organizational expedients, to new insertions into an already excessive government bureaucracy. There are admittedly limits to what government can hope to accomplish in democratic society, especially in the face of complex socioeconomic forces and trends. It should not be forgotten, however, that it is the mandate of government in democratic societies to spotlight critical national priorities, to devise and propose strategies for meeting them, and to assert leadership in the process. That applies particularly to the highest responsibility of government: safeguarding the nation's security.


NOTES
1.
U.S. Air Force Association, The State of the United States Science and Technology Program.
2.
The Mac Group, The Impact on Defense Industrial Capability of Changes in Procurement and Tax Policy, 1988.

-184-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Paying the Premium: A Military Insurance Policy for Peace and Freedom
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Contributions in Military Studies ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • 1: In Search of an American "Defense Insurance Policy" 1
  • Notes 11
  • 2: Risks and Uncertainties in a Changing World 13
  • Note 31
  • 3: Army Forces for the Future 33
  • 4: Naval Forces for the Future 55
  • 5: Tactical Air Forces for the Future 71
  • 6: Marine Forces for the Future 93
  • Notes 109
  • 7: Strategic Forces for the Future 111
  • Notes 122
  • 8: Coping with Global Missile Proliferation 123
  • 9: The Pivotal Elements: Airlift and Sealift 141
  • 10: The Need for Forward Prepositioning 159
  • 11: The U.S. Defense- Industrial Base 173
  • Notes 184
  • 12: Conclusion: How the Challenges and Dangers of the Post-Containment Era Can Be Mastered 185
  • Notes 189
  • Index 191
  • About the Editors and Contributors 197
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 204

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.