Ten Years of German Unification: One State, Two Peoples

By Charlotte Kahn | Go to book overview

6
Women at Home and at Work

We all profit from an equal-rights partnership. 1


WILMA

Wilma, a Wessie, has changed her way of life substantially after a marital crisis.

In getting to know the women in the East, I developed a great respect for them. I admire them for the way they coped with their time at work. I believe that these women were more emancipated and more self-assured than women in the West. The women in the West-- and at that time I was still one of them--hid behind their husbands. The husband brought home the money, so he also ruled the house. In the East, the woman had the same right to work outside the home as die man. They coped with their work on a daily basis and ran their households as well. The disadvantage for the children was that at six o'clock in the morning, no matter what the weather, they would be taken to day care.

Of course I'm proud. Now I can say, I did it. I've changed a great deal, In the past, my family was the alpha and omega of my existence, and my husband was the head of the family; I was merely an appendage allowed to perform some social duties. Unfortunately, it's very much like that at the workplace: A woman with the same job as a man is given the title "secretary," while the man is called "specialist." I've completely broken out of this situation and have built up something

-113-

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Ten Years of German Unification: One State, Two Peoples
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xiii
  • Notes xxvii
  • 1 - Over, Under, Around, and Through! 1
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - Consensual Rape 25
  • Notes 40
  • 3 - Ossies and Wessies Meet Each Other 41
  • Note 67
  • 4 69
  • 5 - The Right and the Duty to Work 91
  • Notes 111
  • 6 - Women at Home and at Work 113
  • Notes 130
  • 7 - Youth on Their Way 133
  • Notes 155
  • 8 - The Voters Decide 159
  • Notes 181
  • 9 - Last Words 183
  • Notes 193
  • The Speakers 197
  • Appendix 213
  • Glossary 215
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 223
  • About the Author 229
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