Ten Years of German Unification: One State, Two Peoples

By Charlotte Kahn | Go to book overview

Appendix
To discover how individual lives had been affected by the German unification, forty-one people were interviewed. Twenty-eight interview partners were chosen from the respondents to identical advertisements in two Berlin newspapers. Geographic location and time constraints eliminated some respondents. An effort was made to balance women and men, young and old, east and west interview partners. In addition to the chosen newspaper respondents, twelve additional participants were referred by acquaintances and one by an interviewee. Quite obviously, this is not a random sample of Germans, east and west, not even of Berliners. However, informal observations and conversations with acquaintances and friends, their parents and children, taxi drivers, and a manicurist pointed to a general consistency in responses over and above the idiosyncratic perceptions of each interview partner.
Of the 41 interview partners, 25 were women, 16 men.
There were 17 seniors (born before 1945), 8 women and 9 men.
Fifteen were of the middle generation (born 1945-1964), 9 women and 6 men.
Eight were youths (born in 1978-79), 4 women and 4 men.
One young married woman (born 1968).

Among the interviewees were several West Germans, some of whom had recently found jobs in the east and two who had relocated to the east. Two formerly East Germans had relocated west.

Their vocations ranged from skilled worker to independently established

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Ten Years of German Unification: One State, Two Peoples
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • Introduction xiii
  • Notes xxvii
  • 1 - Over, Under, Around, and Through! 1
  • Notes 24
  • 2 - Consensual Rape 25
  • Notes 40
  • 3 - Ossies and Wessies Meet Each Other 41
  • Note 67
  • 4 69
  • 5 - The Right and the Duty to Work 91
  • Notes 111
  • 6 - Women at Home and at Work 113
  • Notes 130
  • 7 - Youth on Their Way 133
  • Notes 155
  • 8 - The Voters Decide 159
  • Notes 181
  • 9 - Last Words 183
  • Notes 193
  • The Speakers 197
  • Appendix 213
  • Glossary 215
  • Selected Bibliography 219
  • Index 223
  • About the Author 229
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