Videostyle in Presidential Campaigns: Style and Content of Televised Political Advertising

By Lynda Lee Kaid; Anne Johnston | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The videostyle concept evolved over a long time, and the research necessary to carry out a project of this magnitude involved many individuals. The authors are, first and foremost, indebted to the Political Communication Center (PCC) at the University of Oklahoma for access to the Julian P. Kanter Political Commerical Archive. This archive, with its unequalled collection of political spots, was a necessary resource without which the project could not have been accomplished. In addition, many individuals served as coders, helped with the video compilations, and assisted with data analysis over the years, including Robert Gobetz, Jane Garner, Lewis Mazanti, Karen Lane DeRosa, John Hilbert, Julia Spiker, Lori Melton McKinnon, Mei-ling Yang, Steve O'Geary, Holly Hart, Yang Lin, Mike Chanslor, Cindy Roper, John Ballotti, Gary Noggle, Dolores Flamiano, and Robin Bisha. More than any single individual, John Tedesco was a constant source of ideas and constructive suggestions. Those who aided the international aspects of the project are listed in Chapter 9.

In addition to the support of the PCC, the project also acknowledges the financial assistance of the PEW Trust, Curtis Gans and the Committee for the Study of the American Electorate, and the Media Content

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