Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town

By Gustave Flaubert; Gerard Hopkins | Go to book overview

Restoration, was now eager to re-enter politics, and was embarking on a long-range campaign with the object of ensuring his election to the Chamber of Deputies. In winter he distributed large quantities of firewood, and, as a member of the local council, showed much vigour in putting forward constant demands for new roads in this constituency. During the hot weather he had had an abscess in his mouth which Charles had lanced and quite miraculously relieved. The steward who had been sent to Tostes to pay the doctor reported, when he got back that evening, that he had seen some magnificent cherries in his garden. Now, it so happened that the cherry-trees at La Vaubyessard were far from healthy. The Marquis, therefore, asked Bovary to let him have a few slips for grafting, made a point of going to thank him in person, caught sight of Emma, and decided that she had a pretty figure and manners far superior to those of a mere country-girl. So deeply was he impressed that an invitation was duly sent. This did not, in the opinion of his family, overstep the bounds of decent condescension, and need not be viewed as constituting a social indiscretion.

At three o'clock one Wednesday, therefore, Monsieur and Madame Bovary got into their phaeton, and set off for La Vaubyessard with a large trunk strapped behind, and a hat-box in front. In addition to these, Charles had a cardboard box wedged between his legs.

They arrived at nightfall just as the lamps in the park were being lighted to show the carriages the way.


CHAPTER VIII

THE château was a modern building in the Italian style,* with two projecting wings and a flight of three steps. It lay spread out at the far end of a great expanse of greensward on which a few cows were grazing among the well-spaced clumps of large trees. Small groups of shrubs, rhododendrons, syringa and white-flowering hawthorn, showed rounded and uneven tufts of green along the winding course of the gravelled drive. There was a river with a bridge, and it was possible to discern through the misty air the thatched roofs of various buildings scattered about the park which was flanked by the gentle slopes of two thickly wooded hills. Behind the house, in a grove of trees, stood the coach-houses and stables set in two

-41-

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Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Select Bibliography xxi
  • A Chronology of Gustave Flaubert xxiii
  • Part One - Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 10
  • Chapter II 17
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter II 27
  • Chapter VI 31
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VII 41
  • Chapter VII 50
  • Part Two - Chapter I 61
  • Chapter II 69
  • Chapter II 75
  • Chapter II 85
  • Chapter II 89
  • Chapter VI 98
  • Chapter VII 110
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter VIII 138
  • Chapter VIII 148
  • Chapter VIII 156
  • Chapter XII 169
  • Chapter XIII 182
  • Chapter XIV 191
  • Chapter XIV 201
  • Part Three - Chapter I 211
  • Chapter I 211
  • Chapter II 225
  • Chapter II 234
  • Chapter II 236
  • Chapter II 239
  • Chapter II 255
  • Chapter II 271
  • Chapter II 284
  • Chapter II 301
  • Chapter X 309
  • Chapter XI 314
  • Explanatory Notes 325
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