Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town

By Gustave Flaubert; Gerard Hopkins | Go to book overview

drawn by three horses, one of which acted as leader. Whenever it went down hill, the bottom bumped against the road.

A few citizens of Yonville began to collect in the square, all talking at once, asking for news and explanations and demanding anticipated packages. Hivert was thoroughly muddled, not knowing whom to answer first. It was he who carried out local commissions in town, making the round of the shops, and bringing back rolls of leather for the cobbler, old iron for the smith, a barrel of herrings for his mistress, hats from the milliner, hair-pieces from the barber. All the way along the road on the homeward journey, he delivered these various parcels, throwing them over farmyard walls, standing on his seat and shouting at the top of his lungs, while the horses continued on their way unattended.

An accident had delayed him. Madame Bovary's greyhound had dashed away across the fields. They had wasted a quarter of an hour whistling for him. Hivert had even gone back half a mile, thinking at each moment that he saw him. Finally, however, they had had to go on. Emma had cried and worked herself into a temper. She told Charles that he was to blame for this misfortune. Monsieur Lheureux, the draper, who was with them in the carriage, had tried to console her by telling stories of lost dogs who had recognized their masters many years later. He had heard of one, he said, who had travelled all the way from Constantinople to Paris, while another had covered fifty leagues in a straight line and swum four rivers. His own father had had a poodle which, after an absence of four years, had suddenly jumped up on him in the street one evening as he was going out to dine.


CHAPTER II

EMMA got out first, followed by Félicité, Monsieur Lheureux and a nurse. It was necessary to wake Charles who had fallen fast asleep in his corner when darkness fell.

Homais introduced himself. He offered his respects to Madame, his compliments to Monsieur, and said that he was delighted to think that he had been able to do them some small service. He added that, in the absence of his wife, he had taken upon himself the duty of receiving them.

-69-

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Madame Bovary: Life in a Country Town
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Introduction vii
  • Select Bibliography xxi
  • A Chronology of Gustave Flaubert xxiii
  • Part One - Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 10
  • Chapter II 17
  • Chapter II 22
  • Chapter II 27
  • Chapter VI 31
  • Chapter VII 35
  • Chapter VII 41
  • Chapter VII 50
  • Part Two - Chapter I 61
  • Chapter II 69
  • Chapter II 75
  • Chapter II 85
  • Chapter II 89
  • Chapter VI 98
  • Chapter VII 110
  • Chapter VIII 117
  • Chapter VIII 138
  • Chapter VIII 148
  • Chapter VIII 156
  • Chapter XII 169
  • Chapter XIII 182
  • Chapter XIV 191
  • Chapter XIV 201
  • Part Three - Chapter I 211
  • Chapter I 211
  • Chapter II 225
  • Chapter II 234
  • Chapter II 236
  • Chapter II 239
  • Chapter II 255
  • Chapter II 271
  • Chapter II 284
  • Chapter II 301
  • Chapter X 309
  • Chapter XI 314
  • Explanatory Notes 325
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