Poindexter of Washington: A Study in Progressive Politics

By Howard W. Allen | Go to book overview

7.
Return to the Republican Party

ALTHOUGH ISSUES related to World War I must have seemed very important to Poindexter in 1915 and 1916, given his interest in foreign affairs, he seldom spoke out publicly on these matters until after his reelection in 1916. Probably he sensed that these divisive and controversial issues should be avoided in an election campaign especially since Poindexter's prospects for reelection were already clouded by the disastrous defeat of the Progressive party in 1914. At any rate, he played only a minor role in the debate over preparedness legislation, and in 1915 and 1916 he concerned himself, so far as his constituents could tell, with other matters. Poindexter displayed considerable interest during this period however, in two other foreign policy questions: further intervention in Mexico and the status of the Philippine Islands. He also supported efforts to secure passage of a more stringent immigration law, and he cooperated with other progressives to secure passage of the Federal Farm Loan Act. He showed little concern for other issues debated during this session.

The Mexican revolution continued to attract Poindexter's attention even after the Tampico incident in 1914. He obtained the floor of the Senate on January 12, 1915 to deliver a long and bitter attack on Wilson's "do nothing" Mexican policy. If such policy had always been followed by Americans, he

-142-

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Poindexter of Washington: A Study in Progressive Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • 1 - Early Years 1
  • 2 - The Emergence of a Progressive Reformer 13
  • 3 - A Hero of Insurgency 33
  • 4 - A Senate Insurgent 59
  • 5 - The New Freedom 85
  • 6 - Foreign Affairs: A Progressive "Realist" 119
  • 7 - Return to the Republican Party 142
  • 8. World War I: Disruption of the Progressive Coalition 170
  • 9 - The Struggle Against Internationalism and Bolshevism 200
  • 10 - A Harding Republican 226
  • 11 - The Final Years 255
  • Index 317
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