American Poverty in a New Era of Reform

By Harrell R. Rodgers Jr. | Go to book overview

1
Introduction

Poverty may well be America's most serious and costly social problem. Each year millions of Americans live in poverty, and hundreds of billions of public and private dollars are spent annually on efforts to assist the poor. Poverty is also causally interwoven with other costly social problems such as crime, drug and alcohol abuse, homelessness, out-of-wedlock births, poor educational achievement, and domestic violence. Cumulatively these problems account for a huge percentage of all governmental and charitable expenditures.

The number of poor Americans is enormous. Each year since the mid-1960s the federal government has attempted to identify those Americans living in poverty. In the latest available figures, the federal government estimated that over 35 million Americans were poor in 1997, some 13.3 percent of the population (Table 2.1; Figure 3.1). To put this number in perspective, the collective poverty population in 1997 was larger than the total population of California, almost twice the size of the population of Texas, and several million larger than the entire population of Canada.

The cost of services to the poor is staggering. Considering only the major welfare programs (e.g., Temporary Assistance to Needy Families, Food Stamps, Medicaid, Supplemental Security Income), expen-

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
American Poverty in a New Era of Reform
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables and Figures vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Introduction 3
  • 2 - How Many Americans Are Poor? 9
  • 3 - The American Poverty Population 25
  • 4 - Why Are People Poor in America? 63
  • 5 - The American Welfare System 83
  • 6 - Reform: Ending Welfare as We Know It 131
  • 7 - State Welfare Plans Under PRWORA 155
  • 8 - Early Evidence on the Impact of The 1996 Welfare Reform 177
  • 9 - Refining American Social Welfare Policy 205
  • References 217
  • Index 231
  • About the Author *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 239

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.