Nonaligned, Third World, and Other Ground Armies: A Combat Assessment

By Colonel Reuven Gal; Richard A. Gabriel | Go to book overview

Australia

Richard A. Gabriel and Charles S. Oliviero

The Australian Army, a modern, cohesive, and professional force, is a volunteer organization made up of a regular full-time component backed by a part-time reserve. Training is varied, leaning towards the conventional land battle. During the last few decades, the Australians have become specialists in guerrilla and counterinsurgency operations. The army of today can fight either as an independent force or in concert with other armies, and in addition, it contributes to U.N. supervisory or peacekeeping duties as required.

Besides being a military force, the army provides a variety of services to the civil authorities, not all of which are under emergency conditions. At present, for example, army mapping and charting teams are working with civil agencies to produce the first set of detailed maps of the entire continent. Medical teams and army transport, as well as troops, are permanently on call in the event of civil emergency or natural disaster.

The Australian Army is held in high esteem throughout the world. Australian soldiers are known as no nonsense professionals who can be counted upon to do their masters' bidding efficiently and effectively. According to John Keegan:

The Australian army is widely regarded as one of the most efficient, for its size, in the world today. It is a major strategic factor in the politics of southeast Asia and the Pacific, and the repository of a respectable, even awesome, military tradition. Yet it has history, as an effective force, of less than 70 years, and has achieved its reputation largely in the face of strong domestic anti-militarist feeling. 1

How did Australia, one of Great Britain's many colonies, develop an army that has become more highly regarded than that of any other Commonwealth nation? Australia's past holds the answer to that question.

Australia was first settled as a penal colony late in the eighteenth century. In this way, the English were able to reduce the crowding in their jails and

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Nonaligned, Third World, and Other Ground Armies: A Combat Assessment
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps, Figures, and Tables ix
  • Foreword xi
  • Preface xv
  • Acknowledgments xvii
  • Introduction xix
  • India and Pakistan 3
  • Bibliography 26
  • China 29
  • Bibliography 53
  • Vietnam 55
  • Notes 74
  • Notes 76
  • Thailand 79
  • Notes 97
  • Bibliography 100
  • North Korea 103
  • Notes 124
  • Notes 125
  • South Korea 127
  • Bibliography 150
  • Japan 153
  • Bibliography 172
  • Australia 177
  • Note 190
  • Bibliography 190
  • Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) 191
  • Bibliography 207
  • South Africa 209
  • Notes 221
  • Notes 222
  • Cuba 225
  • Notes 241
  • Notes 243
  • Yugoslavia 247
  • Notes 259
  • Notes 261
  • Index 263
  • About the Contributors 275
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