Responding to Defense Dependence: Policy Ideas and the American Defense Industrial Base

By Erik R. Pages | Go to book overview

4
Relief for the Machine Tool Industry?

American DIB policy, as we have seen, has relied almost exclusively on market forces as the best means to provide U.S. troops with effective weapons. This hands-off policy persists, even though many economic indicators highlight growing foreign dependence and erosion of the industrial base. Policy ideas dating back to the early 1950s continued to influence policymakers throughout the 1980s, preventing them from contemplating more active support for the DIB. The lingering power of these policy ideas makes the decision to actively support the U.S. machine tool industry especially remarkable.

The machine tool sector was the one of the first industries whose decline was widely cited for its dangerous impact on U.S. national security. Indeed, the 1980 Ichord Panel report paid special attention to the machine tool industry's plight, noting that "import penetration into certain industrial sectors, such as machine tools. . . suggests an unacceptable dependency on foreign sources for key elements of defense production."1

As the U.S. machine tool sector continued to deteriorate, demands for action grew. During the early and mid-1980s, reversing the industry's slide became a cause celebre for many advocates of a government industrial policy.

In the end, the machine tool industry's supporters succeeded in convincing the Reagan administration to negotiate trade protection for U.S. firms and to create a package of domestic initiatives to revitalize the industry. Yet success was slow in coming as the Reagan administration delayed action for more than three years. This success is largely attributable to the industry's ability to educate key policymakers about the importance of machine tools, and policymakers' own search for new solutions to the unfamiliar problem of defense dependence.


BACKGROUND: THE AMERICAN MACHINE TOOL INDUSTRY

The machine tool industry is quite small and accounts for only 0.10 percent of

-73-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Responding to Defense Dependence: Policy Ideas and the American Defense Industrial Base
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 191

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.