Genocide: Conceptual and Historical Dimensions

By George J. Andreopoulos | Go to book overview

Contributors

George J. Andreopoulos, lecturer and former associate director of the Orville H. Schell Center for International Human Rights at Yale, has written on diplomatic history, international relations, and international human rights. Forthcoming publications include The Laws of War: Constraints on Warfare in the Western World (with Michael Howard and Mark Shulman ), and Recovery from Defeat (with Harold Selesky). He is currently working on a book on humanitarian intervention.

Frank Chalk, associate professor of history at Concordia University, and chairman of the Executive Committee of the Montreal Institute for Genocide Studies, is the coauthor (with Kurt Jonassohn) of The History and Sociology of Genocide: Analysis and Case Studies ( 1990). His essays have appeared in a number of books, including Genocide in the Modern Age, edited by Isidor Wallimann and Michael N. Dobkowski, and Genocide: A Critical Bibliographic Review, edited by Israel Charny.

Israel W. Charny, executive director of the Institute on the Holocaust and Genocide, Jerusalem, is the author of How Can We Commit the Unthinkable? Genocide, the Human Cancer ( 1982); editor, with Shamai Davidson , of The Book of the International Conference on the Holocaust and Genocide ( 1983); editor of Toward the Understanding and Prevention of Genocide ( 1984); and editor of Genocide: A Critical Bibliographic Review, (two vols., 1988, 1991).

James Dunn, a foreign affairs and human rights specialist, has been a diplomat and senior adviser to the Australian Parliament and served in East Timor as consul. He is the author of Timor: A People Betrayed, and has testified before a Congressional committee on the subject. He is a foreign affairs columnist for The Bulletin.

Helen Fein, executive director of the Institute for the Study of Genocide and currently a Visiting Scholar at the Human Rights Program at Harvard Law School, is the author of Genocide: A Sociological Perspective, Current Sociology 38:1 (Spring 1990), and Accountingfor Genocide: National Responses and Jewish Victimization during the Holocaust

-253-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Genocide: Conceptual and Historical Dimensions
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 272

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.