The Gendering of American Politics: Founding Mothers, Founding Fathers, and Political Patriarchy

By Mark E. Kann | Go to book overview
them from protecting, provisioning, or governing their women and children. If blacks could not be "men," then they could not be rehabilitated to manhood. Similarly, most founders felt that Indian males could never measure up to manhood or be rehabilitated to it. Whites did not consider Indian males sufficiently independent or patriarchal to qualify for manhood. Many founders felt that Indian males were uncivilized and, worse yet, subordinated to wives who grew the crops and participated in tribal politics. If Indian husbands were inherently effeminate, then they too could not be reformed.Second, the founders' faith in male reform was limited by their still-modest expectations regarding most men. Family men as well as those criminals who regained their freedom, resumed their status as family heads, and now voted in elections, could be trusted and empowered only so far. They still shared the darker side of men's nature. They were passionate, impulsive, avaricious creatures subject to mob enthusiasms and criminal relapses. Furthermore, average family patriarchs and rehabilitated criminals lacked the experience, wisdom, and virtue needed to guide and administer a new nation fragmented by internal conflict and surrounded by powerful enemies. Most founders were willing to grant limited citizenship to males who measured up to the dominant standards of manhood but they were convinced that a small elite group of men was needed to govern the nation.
CONCLUSION
The American founders believed that "all men" had an abstract capacity to be free and equal but they feared that most men indulged passion, impulse, interest, and aggression only to cause disorder in public life. Their primary outlook on manhood and politics can be summarized as follows:
1. A mature man was an independent male who disciplined his passions, assumed family responsibilities, governed women and dependents, fit into society, and contributed to civic life. A mature man was a "not-woman."

-89-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Gendering of American Politics: Founding Mothers, Founding Fathers, and Political Patriarchy
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction - Founding Fathers and Founding Mothers xi
  • PART ONE Remember the Ladies 1
  • CHAPTER 1 - Women's Exclusion from Politics 22
  • CHAPTER 2 - The Case for Women's Inclusion 45
  • CHAPTER 3 - The Doctrine of Republican Womanhood 64
  • PART TWO - The Ranks of Men 69
  • CHAPTER 4 - Disorderly Men 89
  • CHAPTER 5 - A Small Governing Elite 110
  • CHAPTER 6 - Weak Citizens and Gentleman Legislators 134
  • Conclusion - The Founder's Legacy 137
  • Chapter 7 - America's Gendered Politics 139
  • Notes 165
  • Bibliography 183
  • Index 191
  • About the Author 195
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 200

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.