Institutional Sustainability in Agriculture and Rural Development: A Global Perspective

By Derick W. Brinkerhoff; Arthur A. Goldsmith | Go to book overview

9
The Three Phases of Sustainability in Morocco's Institut Agronomique et Vétérinaire Hassan II

Alice L. Morton and James B. Lowenthal

The ability of organizations in the developing world to adapt to the dramatically changing conditions of the 1990s has become an increasing concern of international development agencies. To address this problem, development management practitioners have devoted increasing efforts to better understand the dynamics of sustaining the benefit flows of key sectoral institutions in the Third World. Drawing on major traditions of organizational theory, researchers have attempted to refine a set of theoretical propositions on institutional sustainability. These propositions, collectively known as SCOPE, make use of basic systems theory ( Katz & Kahn, 1978), organizational contingency theory ( Thompson, 1967; Lawrence & Lorsch, 1967), and political economy ( Zald, 1970) to describe how Third World organizations cope with sustainability issues (see Chapter 3).

The purpose of this chapter is to apply aspects of the SCOPE framework to a specific Third World organizational setting to determine the model's utility in explaining sustainability prospects. The institution is Morocco's Institut Agronomique et Vétérinaire Hassan II (IAV), an agricultural university that prepares students for undergraduate and graduate degrees (including the doctorate) in the agricultural sciences. Since the IAV is currently facing sustainability issues, the results of this analysis can also be used to suggest sustainability strategies for the 1990s. Finally, the outcomes can be used to propose modifications to the SCOPE framework.

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