The Roots of Justice: Crime and Punishment in Alameda County, California, 1870-1910

By Lawrence M. Friedman; Robert V. Percival | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The research on this study was supported, and generously, by LEAA Grant No. 75-N1-99-0080, and NSF Grant No. SOC 76-24217. We want to thank both these agencies for their willingness to invest funds in historical study. Final touches and last-minute research were supported by the Law and Behavioral Research Fund of Stanford Law School.

Many students helped us with the research, and we want to thank them, especially Mark Chavez, Thomas Devine, Anne Doolin, Janet Feldman, Jack Gillman, Clifford J. Halverson, Walter Lion, Carol Lombardini, Craig Nelson, Anne Packer, Donald Percival, and Lawrence Ponoroff. We also want to thank Richard Abel, Jonathan Casper, Thomas Grey, Marc Haller, Herbert Jacob, and Sheldon Messinger for their helpful suggestions, and very specially, Stanton Wheeler; also Joseph D. Flagiello, Jr., Mrs. Frances Buxton, George Sumner (Warden of San Quentin), and the following institutions: California State Archives, the Oakland Museum, Oakland Public Library, Stanford Law School Library, especially Myron Jacobstein, Iris Wildman, Joan Howland, and Kathy Shimpock, and the Office of the County Clerk of Alameda County. Mrs. Joy St John typed draft after draft with great patience and efficiency.

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