Learning and Memory: The Behavioral and Biological Substrates

By Isidore Gormezano; Edward A. Wasserman | Go to book overview

chapter we have reviewed the previous analyses of time perception and the influence of various treatments on the speed of the internal clock involved in such time perception. Then we attempted to extend this analysis to the timing of repetitive responses (drinking by rats and tapping by people).

The major strength of the physiological analysis of clock speed is that it provides explicit predictions of the effect of various treatments (such as injection of methamphetamine) on the intervening variable. The major strength of the cognitive model is that it provides explicit predictions of the effects of changes in the intervening variable (such as clock speed) on behavior. It appears that dopaminergic drugs affect the internal clock, and that the internal clock is a critical module in temporal perception and timed performance.


ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

The authors express appreciation to J. Michael Walker, Jeffrey Winter, and Jennifer Home for contributions to the collection and interpretation of the drinking behavior of the animals, to Charles Collyer for helpful comments on the Tau- Gamma model, and to Stephen Fairhurst and Nick Staddon for programming contributions. This research was supported in part by a Grant from the National Institute of Mental Health, ROI-MH44234.


REFERENCES

Burbeck S. L., & Luce R. D. ( 1982). "Evidence from auditory simple reaction times for both change and level detectors". Perception & Psychophysics, 32, 117-133.

Catania A. C. ( 1970). Reinforcement schedules and psychophysical judgments: A study of some temporal properties of behavior. In W. N. Schoenfeld, The theory of reinforcement schedules (pp. 1-42). New York: Appleton-Century-Crofts.

Church R. M. ( 1989). Theories of timing behavior. In S. B. Klein & R. R. Mowrer (Eds.), Contemporary learning theory (Vol 2, pp. 41-71). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Church R. M., & Deluty M. Z. ( 1977). "Bisection of temporal intervals". Journal of Experimental Psychology: Animal Behavior Processes. 3, 216-228.

Church R. M., Miller K. D., Meck W. H., & Gibbon J. ( 1991). "Symmetrical and asymmetrical sources of variance in temporal generalization". Animal Learning & Behavior, 19, 207-214.

Corbit J. D., & Luschei E. S. ( 1969). "Invariance of the rat's rate of drinking". Journal of Comparative and Physiological Psychology, 69, 119-125.

Creelman C. D. ( 1962). "Human discrimination of auditory duration". Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 34, 582-593.

Gibbon J. ( 1977). "Scalar expectancy theory and Weber's law in animal timing". Psychological Review, 84, 279-325.

Gibbon J. & Allan L. G. (Eds.). ( 1984). "Timing and time perception". Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences (Vol. 423). New York: New York Academy of Sciences.

Gibbon J., & Church R. M. ( 1984). Sources of variance in information processing theories of timing. In H. L. Roitblat, T. G. Bever. & H. S. Terrace (Eds.), Animal cognition (pp. 465-488). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.

Gibbon J., Church R. M., & Meck. W. H. ( 1984). Scalar timing in memory. In J. Gibbon & L. G.Allan

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