Multidimensional Models of Perception and Cognition

By F. Gregory Ashby | Go to book overview

5 A General Probabilistic Model for Triad Discrimination, Preferential Choice, and Two-Alternative Identification

Daniel M. Ennis
Philip Morris Research Center and Department of Physiology
Medical College of Virginia

Kenneth Mullen
Department of Mathematics and Statistics
University of Guelph

From a mathematical modeling viewpoint, there are very close parallels between triad discrimination, preferential choice, and two-alternative identification under certain assumptions concerning the decision rules employed. The purpose of this chapter is to introduce a very general probabilistic model in a computationally simple form that can be used to model results obtained from several different types of psychological tasks. Chapter 11 contains a discussion of a number of probabilistic models of identification. One of these models, based on ordinal decision rules, will be covered in this chapter.

It might be useful to begin by providing a general overview of tasks involving three alternatives. First consider the situation in which all three alternatives are stimuli. Depending on the instructions, these tasks are variants of the Method of Triads. Two methods have been commonly discussed in the literature. Torgerson ( 1958) refers to one of them as the "complete method of triads," which we call Torgerson's Method of Triads, and the other as "Richardson's method of triadic combinations" ( 1938), which we call Richardson's Method of Triads. In Torgerson's Method of Triads, the three stimuli are presented to the subject in each of three independent trials. On each trial, one stimulus is designated as the standard. The subject's task is to select from the remaining two stimuli, the stimulus most similar to the standard. Each stimulus serves as the standard for one of the three trials. For instance, in the first trial, the subject's task might be to select which of Sj or Sk is most similar to Si. The symbol iPjk is the probability that Si is more similar to Sj than Sk. The three trials are independent and may give rise to different psychological magnitudes from trial to trial for the same stimulus. Richardson's Method of Triads involves a single presentation of the three stimuli and the subject's task is to judge which two objects are most alike perceptually

-115-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Multidimensional Models of Perception and Cognition
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 526

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.