European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview

16.
Treaty between Spain and Portugal concluded at Saragossa, April 22, 1529. Ratification by Spain, April 23, 1529, and by Portugal, June 20, 1530.

INTRODUCTION.

The treaty concluded at Saragossa on April 17, 1529,1 by the plenipotentiaries of Spain and Portugal, was not ratified. Five days later, in the same city, the same plenipotentiaries, with one additional representative of Spain,2 concluded a second treaty. This differed from the first in several particulars, most strikingly in the omission of the provisions of the twelfth article--that the Emperor should order his Royal Council to find out whether the treaty could be legally made without the approval of the pueblos. The omission of this article is explained by a document preserved in the National Archives at Lisbon, which contains: (1) the decision reached by lawyers of the Royal Council to the effect that the Emperor and King of Castile might legally enter into the contract in respect to the Moluccas, and that the consent, authorization, and approbation of his towns were not necessary; (2) the Emperor's confirmation and promise to regard the lawyers' decision, and his abrogation of all contrary laws and regulations. The Emperor's letter is dated April 23, 1529.3

____________________
1
Doc. 15.
2
García de Padilla, who signed the treaty of Vitoria, and was employed in the negotiations of 1526. See Doc. 13, note 16, and Doc. 14.
3
"Don Carlos, por la divina clemencia etc. enperador semper augusto, rrey de Alemaña, Dona Juana, su madre, y el mismo Don Carlos, su hijo, por la gracia de Dios rreyes de Castilla, de Leon, de Aragon, de las Dos Sicilias, de Jerusalem, de Navarra, de Granada, de Toledo, de Valencia, de Galizia, de Mallorcas, de Sevilla, de Cerdena, de Cordova, de Corcega, de Murcia, de Jaen, de los Algarves, de Algezira, y de Gibraltar, de las Islas de Canaria, de las Indias, Islas, e tierra firme del Mar Oceano, archiduques d'Austria, duques de Borgoña, y de Brabante, condes de Barcelona, Flandes, y Tirol, señores de Viscaya, y de Molina, duques de Atenas, y de Neopatria, condes de Ruysillon, y de Cerdenia, marquezes de Oristan, y de Gociano, etc.

"Hacemos saber a Jos que esta nuestra carta vieren, que nós mandamos vêr a los del nuestro Real Consejo cierta dubda, sy podriamos concordar e asentar con el Serenissimo, muy Alto, y muy Poderozo Rey de Portugal, nuestro muy caro, y muy amado hermano, sobre las Islas de Maluco, y otras islas, e mares y tierras a ellas comarcanas, y vimos su declaracion, y determinacion en las espaldas d'esta nuestra carta escrita, y dada, y fecha por ellos, y la leimos, y entendimos: la qual aprovamos, confirmamos, e avemos por buena, firme, e valiosa, como en ella es contenido; y esto sin enbargo de qualesquier leyes, derechos, hordenaciones, capitulos de Cõrtes, determinaciones, sentencias, glosas, hazañas, y opiniones de dottores, y de qualesquier otras cosas, que en contrario sean, o puedan ser, puesto que sean tales, que por derecho se deva hacer dellas espresa mencion, y derogacion, y abrogamos, y derogamos, e avemos por casadas, e anulladas todas las leyes, e derecho, que en contrario sean, y las leyes, y direchos, que disponen que general renunciacion no vale: Y promettemos por nós, y por nuestros subcesores de nunca yr,

-169-

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