European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview

24.*
*Cession of the Netherlands by Philip II. of Spain to his daughter, Isabella-Clara-Eugenia, on condition of her marriage with the Archduke Albert. Madrid, May 6, 1598.

INTRODUCTION.

On May 6, 1598, Philip II., the dying king of Spain, signed two acts, a public and a private, conditionally ceding to his daughter Isabella, in anticipation of her marriage to the Archduke Albert of Austria, the old Burgundian dominions--the seventeen provinces of the Netherlands, and the counties of Burgundy and Charolais. The public act--part of which is printed below-- regulated the mode of succession to the principality; provided that in default of descendants from the "Archdukes" the territory should revert to the Spanish crown; that the principality should not be infeoffed or alienated without the consent of Spain; that a female ruler should marry the King of Spain, his son, or some one acceptable to the king, and that marriages of children of rulers should also be acceptable to the king; that future rulers must take an oath to hold to the Catholic faith; and that neither the rulers nor their subjects should trade in the East or West Indies. The private act1 stipulated that Spain should, at its discretion, keep Antwerp, Ghent, and some other strong places in the southern provinces, regulating and paying for their defense; and that the archdukes and their successors should persecute heretics and retain none but Catholics in their household or service.

By thus establishing a quasi-independent government in the Netherlands, Philip II. had hoped to induce the rebellious northern provinces to reunite with the southern.2 In August, 1598, the government at Brussels wrote to the States General at the Hague, urging them to reunion.3 Toward the end of 1598, the new King of Spain, Philip III., attempted to coerce the Dutch by closing to them the very profitable trade with Spain and Portugal; and about the same time the archdukes also prohibited commerce with the rebels.4 But the Dutch would be neither persuaded nor coerced into submission. In March, 1599, they responded to the overtures of the Brussels government by pointing out the disadvantageous character of the terms of Philip's cession,

____________________
1
The private act is in Brants, Ordonnances des Pays-bas, Règne d'Albert et Isabelle, I. 12-13, and in Navarrete, Col. de Docs. para la Hist. de España, XLII. 222-225.
2
L. P. Gachard, Documents Inédits concernant l'Histoire de la Belgique ( 1833- 1835), I. 378.
3
Gachard, Actes des États Généraux de 1600, pp. xxxiii ff.
4
Gachard, ibid., pp. lxxii-lxxiv.

-235-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.