European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview

29.

Treaty of Guaranty between the United Netherlands, France, and Great Britain, concluded at the Hague, June 7/17, 1609. Ratification by the States General, June 6/16, 1609. [Ratification by France July 16, and by Great Britain July 10/20, 1609.]


INTRODUCTION.

Among the matters treated of at the Hague during the summer of 1607 were alliances between France and the United Netherlands, and England and the United Netherlands, to guarantee the observance of the peace then being negotiated between the States General of the United Provinces and Spain.1 The Dutch greatly desired these alliances; and the French, and ultimately the English, were ready to become their confederates if safeguarded against a consequent embroilment with Spain.

By the defensive alliance concluded on January 23, 1608,2 the King of France promised to help the States to obtain a satisfactory peace with Spain, to protect them against its infringement, and, if necessary for this purpose, to send them 10,000 infantry for as long as required. In return the States agreed, if the king were attacked, to supply him with 5000 infantry or with ships of war, equipped and manned, and of not less than 200 or 300 tons burden. Neither party, after having received aid from the other, should make a treaty with an aggressor without the other's consent. The similar treaty between England and the United Provinces, signed June 16/26, 1608, provided that in case of violation of the peace, the King of England should aid the States with 20 well-equipped ships of from 300 to 600 tons, and with 6000 infantry and 400 cavalry, yearly. If any of England's dominions were attacked, the States should send the king an equal naval force, and assist him yearly with 4000 infantry and 300 cavalry.3 This Anglo-Dutch alliance was obnoxious to the King of Spain,4 who, during the negotiations, remonstrated against England's occupation of Virginia, perhaps in order to impress

____________________
1
See Doc. 28, introduction.
2
The ratification by the States on Jan. 25, 1608, is printed in Jeannin, Négociations, ed. cit., III. 148-157, and thence in Dumont, Corps Diplomatique V. ( 2), 89-91.
3
The ratification by the States, June 17/27, 1608, and by the King of Great Britain, July 20/30, 1608, are in T. Rymer, Foedera ( 1704- 1735), XVI. 667-673; the protocol is in L. van Aitzema, Saken van Staet en Oorlogh ( 1669- 1672), I. 13, 14, and thence in Dumont, op. cit., V. ( 2), 94, 95.
4
Winwood, Memorials, II. 403, 404, 408, 413 ff.

-270-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 388

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.