European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview

navigations should form the subject of later negotiations by the French ambassador at the Hague. The treaty further provided that a loan should be made by the king to the States General, to be repaid after the conclusion of a Dutch-Spanish peace or truce, which should be made only with the advice of the king; that if the king should need money or go to war, the States should aid him with half the amount of his loan to them, or with men and ships; that within six months the States should guarantee the western part of the Mediterranean8 against the depredations of the corsairs of Algiers and Tunis, and restore French ships and goods taken by the pirates in those waters and found in Dutch ports; and that commissioners of the Admiralty, who should have no interest in the war-ships or prizes they adjudged, should decide French claims within three months. A special article permitted the exercise of the Catholic religion to Frenchmen in the house of the French ambassador in the Netherlands.

The treaty was concluded on June 10. It is curious that Richelieu says in his Mémoires that it was concluded on July 20, and that the Dutch agreed thereby "que non-seulement ils ne donneront point d'empêchement, mais toute assistance, à nos marchands trafiquans aux Indes orientales et occidentales; leur laisseront le choix des côtes pour y trafiquer en toute sûreté et liberté, et les associeront avec eux en leurs navigations èsdits pays".9 Doubtless Richelieu is also responsible for the same false account of the treaty given in the Mercure François.10

On December 9, when the French ambassador, d'Espesses, presented his letters of credence at the Hague, he recommended the pretensions of the East India Company of Dieppe;11 but neither the desire of the French to share Dutch trade in the East, nor the desire of the Dutch to organize with the French against Spain on the western seas, was carried into effect.


BIBLIOGRAPHY.

Text: MS. The original manuscript of the protocol and the ratification by the King of France are in the Ryksarchief at the Hague, Secrete Casse, casse A, loquet S, nos. 36 and 37. No original manuscript of the treaty was found by the editor in the Paris archives, but several copies are in the archives of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Paris, Correspondance Politique, Hollande, vol. IX., ff. 270-352.

Text: Printed. The protocol and the French and Dutch ratifications are in L. van Aitzema, Saken van Staet en Oorlogh ( 1669-1672), I. 284-287,

____________________
10
Tom. X. ( 1625), pp. 492-495. I. Disraeli, Life and Reign of Charles I. ( 1851), I. viii, says that Richelieu supplied accounts of state documents, including treaties, to the Mercure François.
11
Aitzema, op. cit., I. 357. An account of the French East India companies is given in P. Bonnassieux, Les Grandes Compagnies de Commerce ( 1892), pp. 254 ff.
8
Aitzema (op. cit., I. 288) interprets " la met du ponent " thus.
9
Michaud and Poujoulat, Nouvelle Collection, 2e sér., tom. VII., p. 297.

-286-

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