European Treaties Bearing on the History of the United States and Its Dependencies to 1648

By Frances Gardiner Davenport | Go to book overview

his return to France, and appointing D'Aulnay governor and lieutenant- general on the coast of Acadia.14 In the autumn of 1644, D'Aulnay's envoy, M. Marie, journeyed to Boston, showed Governor Endicott a commission from the King of France in which La Tour was condemned as a rebel; complained of the assistance given to La Tour; and proffered peace and amity. Massachusetts colony, however, had not the power to conclude an alliance independently, since in May, 1643, it had agreed to the articles of the New England Confederation, whereby all matters pertaining to war, peace, and leagues, were entrusted to the commissioners of the Confederacy.15 On condition of ratification by the Confederation the magistrates signed an agreement with M. Marie on October 8, stipulating that the English of Massachusetts, and the French under D'Aulnay in Acadia, should keep peace with each other; should have mutual liberty of trade; and should make no reprisals, until satisfaction had been asked and refused--provided, that the English colony should not be bound to prohibit their merchants from trading with any persons whatsoever. The fact that this last provision left the people of Massachusetts free to trade with La Tour indicated a diplomatic victory for their side. Ratification of the treaty was delayed, for relations between the colony and La Tour led at once to further differences with D'Aulnay. It was not until several more conferences had been held that the latter signed the agreement, on September 28, 1646.16 The commissioners of the United Colonies had previously ratified it on September 2, 1645, on condition that it should be ratified by D'Aulnay.


BIBLIOGRAPHY.

Text: MS. No original manuscript of the actual agreement has been found. A Latin draft of the ratification by the Commissioners for the United Colonies, beginning "Conventione et articulis suprascriptis", and agreeing with the printed version verbatim, is preserved in the Massachusetts State Archives, CCXL. 79. Manuscript volumes of the Acts of the Commissioners of the United Colonies of New England, containing the English text printed below, are in the same archives, as well as in the state archives at Hartford.

Text: Printed. Latin. T. Hutchinson, Collection of Original Papers relative to the History of the Colony of Massachusetts-Bay ( 1769), pp. 146, 147; another edition of the same, The Hutchinson Papers, in the Publications of the Prince Society ( 1865), I. 164-167; E. Hazard, Historical Collections ( 1792- 1794), I. 536-537. English. Records of the Colony of New, Plymouth in New England (ed. N. B. Shurtleff and D. Pulsifer, 1855- 1861), IX. Acts of the Commissioners of the United Colonies ofNew England, INew England, I

____________________
14
See Garneau, op. cit., I. 190, note 24, for authorities.
15
Art. 9. The articles are in Records of the Colony of New Plymouth, IX. 3-8; Winthrop, ed. cit., II. 100-105.
16
Records of Massachusetts Bay, III. 44, 45, 76-78; Winthrop, ed. cit., II. 285.

-349-

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