Elements of Socialism: A Text-Book

By John Spargo; George Louis Arner | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VII
INTRODUCTORY

The influence of Karl Marx: As we turn from the Socialist criticism of existing society to the more positive aspects of Socialism we encounter the personality of the greatest thinker and most powerful influence in the history of Socialism, Karl Marx. Professor Thorstein Veblen has said: "The Socialism that inspires hopes and fears in the world to-day is of the school of Marx. No one is seriously apprehensive of any other so-called socialistic movement, and no one is seriously concerned to criticise or refute the doctrines set forth by any other school of 'Socialists.' The Socialists of all countries gravitate toward the theoretical position of avowed Marxism. In proportion as the movement in any given country grows in mass, maturity and conscious purpose, it unavoidably takes on a more consistently Marxian complexion."1

The greatness of Karl Marx is freely admitted by the most implacable opponents of Socialism as well as by its most ardent advocates. The words "Socialism" and "Marxism" are practically synonymous in the vast literature of the subject which has been produced during the last thirty or forty years. Whatever modifications his followers may have made in his theories, or may yet be compelled to make, one fact stands undisputed by friend or foe, namely, that the great international Socialist movement finds in those theories its justification, its intellectual weapons for defense and attack, the rationale of its aspirations toward a better and happier state of society and the bedrock of its assurance in the ultimate attainment of that goal.

Saint-Simon, Fourier and Owen: It is commonly said that Marx found Socialism a Utopian movement and transformed it into a scientific movement. Prior to Marx Social-

____________________
1
Quarterly Journal of Economics, XXI, p. 299

-61-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Elements of Socialism: A Text-Book
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Contents iii
  • Part I- SOCIALISM AS CRITICISM 1
  • Chapter I- Introduction 3
  • Chapter II- Capitalist Society 7
  • LITERATURE 18
  • Chapter III- Planless Production 19
  • LITERATURE 29
  • Chapter IV- Poverty 30
  • LITERATURE 43
  • Chapter V- Leisure and Luxury 44
  • LITERATURE 52
  • Chapter VI- Individual and Social Responsibility 53
  • LITERATURE 58
  • Part II- SOCIALIST THEORY 59
  • Chapter VII- INTRODUCTORY 61
  • Chapter VIII- Social Evolution 65
  • LITERATURE 75
  • Chapter IX- The Economic Interpretation of History 76
  • LITERATURE 90
  • Chapter X- Industrial Evolution 91
  • LITERATURE 99
  • Chapter XI- The Class Struggle Theory 100
  • LITERATURE 115
  • Chapter XII- Value and Price 116
  • LITERATURE 140
  • Chapter XIII- Surplus-Value 141
  • LITERATURE 156
  • Chapter XIV- The Law of Concentration 157
  • LITERATURE 167
  • Chapter XV- Monopolies and Trusts 168
  • LITERATURE 184
  • Part III- THE SOCIALIST IDEAL 185
  • Chapter XVI- The Utopian Socialist Ideal 187
  • LITERATURE 200
  • Chapter XVII- The Ideals of Modern Socialism 201
  • LITERATURE 211
  • Chapter XVIII- Socialist State--Political 212
  • LITERATURE 223
  • Chapter XIX- THE SOCIALIST STATE--ECONOMIC 224
  • Chapter XX- Socialism and the Family 240
  • LITERATURE 251
  • Part IV- THE SOCIALIST MOVEMENT 253
  • Chapter XXI- The Rise and Growth of Modern Socialism 255
  • LITERATURE 265
  • Chapter XXII- The National Socialist Movemenis 266
  • LITERATURE 314
  • Part V- POLICY AND PROGRAM 315
  • Chapter XXIII- Socialism and Social Reform 317
  • LITERATURE 336
  • Chapter XXIV- The Reform Program of Socialism 337
  • LITERATURE 353
  • Chapter XXV- Some Objections to Socialism Considered 354
  • LITERATURE 369
  • Index 371
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 394

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.