Elementary Experiments in Psychology

By Carl E. Seashore | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIII
ATTENTION

For Two.*

IN reading this paragraph your attention moves from word to word, following close upon the movement of the point of regard, and you are probably aware of this movement of attention as an expression of personal activity, as an advancing wave in the tide of your feeling of interest, and as a complex of sensory impressions of bodily condition and processes of adjustment. These are the most direct ways in which we become aware of it; but attention is not an activity in itself, it is not essentially a feeling of interest, nor is it essentially awareness of the processes of bodily accommodation. Attention is the focus of consciousness as a whole, the state or form of concentration of the seeing, thinking, remembering, feeling, doing, etc., at a given moment. Attention is to consciousness as the point of regard is to the field of vision, the focal point.

Rhythm of Attention.--When O is seated with eyes closed, in a quiet room, hold an open watch at such a distance from his ear that he can barely hear it. At a signal let him direct his attention as steadily as

____________________
*
This experiment must be performed in comparative quiet, which is usually best obtained in the evening.

-158-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Elementary Experiments in Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Chapter I- Visual After-Images 1
  • Chapter II- Visual Contrast 13
  • Chapter III- The Visual Field 23
  • Chapter IV- Visual Space 39
  • Chapter V- Auditory Space 55
  • Chapter VI- Tactual Space 71
  • Chapter VII- Cutaneous Sensations 82
  • Chapter VIII- Weber''s Law 91
  • Chapter IX- Mental Images 104
  • Chapter X- Association 118
  • Chapter XI- Memory 131
  • Chapter XII- Apperception 144
  • Chapter XIII- Attention 158
  • Chapter XIV- Normal Illusions 172
  • Chapter XV- Affective Tone 191
  • Chapter XVI- Reation-Time 205
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 218

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.