Elementary Experiments in Psychology

By Carl E. Seashore | Go to book overview

CHAPTER XIV
NORMAL ILLUSIONS

For One.

THE problem is to measure certain normal illusions in visual perception of space. The observer must bear the following principles clearly in mind:

a. These illusions are normal; if they do not appear in the record, that is proof of either incompetence or abnormality in space estimatioin.*

b. These experiments involve a clear distinction between what looks right and what is right. We shall here devote attention to the way things look, not what they really are. The observer is asked to make adjustments so that they look right according to his very best ability, but to make any allowance on the basis of a guess or knowledge of the possible direction and magnitude of the illusion is forbidden. The value of these experiments depends upon the power of self-possession in observing this distinction, and its chief training value also lies in this. The assignment of this experiment is an expression of confidence in the ability and integrity of the observer.

c. The observer must perform all the experiments

____________________
*
Barring rare cases of special training in certain types of illusion.

-172-

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Elementary Experiments in Psychology
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page i
  • Preface iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction ix
  • Chapter I- Visual After-Images 1
  • Chapter II- Visual Contrast 13
  • Chapter III- The Visual Field 23
  • Chapter IV- Visual Space 39
  • Chapter V- Auditory Space 55
  • Chapter VI- Tactual Space 71
  • Chapter VII- Cutaneous Sensations 82
  • Chapter VIII- Weber''s Law 91
  • Chapter IX- Mental Images 104
  • Chapter X- Association 118
  • Chapter XI- Memory 131
  • Chapter XII- Apperception 144
  • Chapter XIII- Attention 158
  • Chapter XIV- Normal Illusions 172
  • Chapter XV- Affective Tone 191
  • Chapter XVI- Reation-Time 205
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