Showing the Flag: The Mounted Police and Canadian Sovereignty in the North, 1894-1925

By William R. Morrison | Go to book overview

Notes

NOTES TO THE INTRODUCTION
1.
For a discussion of northern historiography, see K. S. Coates and W. R. Morrison , "Northern Visions: Recent Developments in the Writing of Northern Canadian History," Manitoba History (Autumn 1985).
2.
Three useful studies along these lines are A. J. Ray and D. Freeman, Give Us Good Measure ( Toronto, 1978); Charles Bishop , The Northern Ojibway and the Fur Trade ( Toronto, 1974); and Shepherd Krech III , ed., The Subarctic Fur Trade: Native Economic and Social Adaptations ( Vancouver, 1984).
3.
This process has been described as it applied to the prairies in R. C. Macleod, "Canadianizing the West: The North- West Mounted Police as Agents of the National Policy, 1873-1905." In L. H. Thomas , ed., Essays on Western History ( Edmonton, 1976).
4.
See "Whalers and Missionaries at Herschel Island," Ethnohistory 28, no. 2 ( 1981); "Atomistic Order and Frontier Violence: Miners and Whalemen in the Nineteenth Century Yukon," Ethnology 22 ( October 1983); "The Mounties as Vigilantes: Perceptions of Community and the Transformation of Law in the Yukon, 1885-1897," Law and Society Review 14, no. 1 ( 1979).
5.
Keith Walden, Visions of Order: The Canadian Mounties in Symbol and Myth ( Toronto, 1982), p. 213.
6.
See Morris Zaslow, "Administering the Arctic Islands, 1880-1940: Policemen, Missionaries, Fur Traders." In M. Zaslow , ed., A Century of Canada's Arctic Islands, 1880-1980 ( Ottawa, 1981).

NOTES TO CHAPTER ONE
1.
The terms "police," "Mounted Police," "North-West Mounted Police" (N.W.M.P.), "Royal North-West Mounted Police" (R.N.W.M.P.), and "Royal Canadian Mounted Police" (R.C.M.P.) are all used here when speaking of this organization. The first two are used indiscriminately, the third is used for the pre-1904 period, the fourth for the years 1904-1919, and fifth for the post-1919 period.
2.
K. S. Coates and I have made this distinction in "Northern Visions."
3.
A discussion of the technical aspects of the question appears in W. R. Morrison, Under the Flag: Canadian Sovereignty and the Native People in Northern Canada ( Ottawa, 1984).
4.
On this point see Carl Betke, "Pioneers and Police on the Canadian Prairies, 1885-1914," Canadian Historical Association Historical Papers, 1980 ( Ottawa, 1981).
5.
For example, R. C. Fetherstonhaugh, The Royal Canadian Mounted Police ( New York, 1940), p. 3. R. C. Macleod, Law Enforcement, 1873 -1905 ( Toronto, 1976) entitles one of his chapters "The Military Tradition in the NWMP," and remarks on the persistence of the force's "original semi-military attributes," p. 102.
6.
For an account of the genesis of the force, see S. W. Horrall, "Sir John A. Macdonald and the Mounted Police Force for the Northwest Territories," Canadian Historical Review 53, no. 2 ( June 1972). Macdonald in 1872 asked Sir John Rose for information on the Royal Irish Constabulary. In 1880 the Commissioner of the N.W.M.P. visited Ireland to study the force at first hand. See N.W.M.P. Report, 1880, p. 3.
7.
R. C. Macleod, Law Enforcement, 1873- 1905, chapter 7, deals at length with the political nature of the force.
8.
Comptroller Frederick White to Commissioner A. B. Perry, 13 February 1905, R.C.M.P. Papers, Public Archives of Canada, Comptroller's Letterbooks, v. 92.
9.
On the subject of patronage in late nineteenth century Canada, see two articles by Gordon T. Stewart: "Political Patronage under Macdonald andLaurier, 1878-1911,"

-187-

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Showing the Flag: The Mounted Police and Canadian Sovereignty in the North, 1894-1925
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Illustrations ix
  • Maps x
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • 1. the Mounted Police 1
  • 2. the Yukon: the Early Period 10
  • 3. the Police and the Gold Rush 28
  • 4. the Police as Civil Servants 50
  • 5. the Police and Yukon Politics 61
  • 6. North of the Arctic Circle 72
  • 7. to Hudson Bay and the Eastern Arctic 87
  • 8. Expanding Activities in the Mackenzie Delta 102
  • 9. Hudson Bay 120
  • 10. Patrols and Patrolling 132
  • 11. the Police and the Native Peoples of the Northern Frontier 142
  • 12. Ultima Thule 162
  • 13. the End of the Frontier 174
  • Notes 187
  • Bibliography 209
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