Boy Meets Girl: Spring Song

By Bella Cohen Spewack; Samuel Spewack | Go to book overview

FOREWORD

Boy Meets Girl is, I think, the best play that has as yet appeared about Hollywood. It is the real thing. And it is the real thing because Bella and Samuel Spewack are reporters as well as dramatists and they report what they see and observe, not what convention would want them to see. They have captured Hollywood so definitely that I am sure that you cannot read this volume without a great consciousness of the kind of place that it is. You don't see the long line of eucalyptus trees outside the windows, but you must know that it is there. You must know that down in the court below C.F.'s window are a dozen strutting assistant directors and executives and innumerable glamorous girls posturing for the benefit of all.

Most of the writings about the great film colony have overlooked an important expression of the Hollywood consciousness. That is the eagerness for culture. We have been given to believe in the past that a cross-section of Hollywood would reveal to us only a great number of not very bright actors ruled over by crass and illiterate producers. But the fact is not quite that. There is a great eagerness for the bigger and better things. In the studio lunch rooms, I have seen a group of executives puzzling their brains over a heavy game of "Guggenheim." And I am sure that the stranger who went to one of their parties expecting, and need I say hoping, to find a gigantic orgy would be shocked and surprised to witness a group of earnest faces puzzling over the latest word game from the metropolis at the other side of the country. Hollywood is secretly ashamed of itself and therefore makes a tremendous effort to do the right

-5-

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Boy Meets Girl: Spring Song
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Boy Meets Girl 1
  • Foreword 5
  • Act One 9
  • Act Two 43
  • Scene I-- 45
  • Scene II 47
  • Scene III 66
  • Act Three 82
  • Scene II--In Your Own Home. That Is, If You Have One, and If You Listen to the Radio. 94
  • Scene III--Mr. Friday's Office, the Following Day. Mr. Friday Is Sitting at His Desk, Dictating to Miss Crews. 95
  • Spring Song 109
  • To Sara and Rose 111
  • Foreword 113
  • Scenes 116
  • Act One 118
  • Act Two 152
  • Act Three 188
  • Act Three 210
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