Boy Meets Girl: Spring Song

By Bella Cohen Spewack; Samuel Spewack | Go to book overview

SCENE II

--The screen lifts, and once more we are in MR. FRIDAY'S office.

C.F. is at his desk, MISS CREWSis seated upstage and at desk; BENSONis on the couch beside LARRY. ROSETTIis seated on the piano bench.

BENSON. Read those figures, Miss Crews.

MISS CREWS. Eighty-two thousand at the Music Hall. Forty-eight thousand five hundred and thirty-eight in Des Moines.

BENSON. Without a stage show.

LARRY. I always went big in Des Moines.

MISS CREWS. Twenty-eight thousand in Newark.

LARRY. That's one of my big towns.

MISS CREWS. Forty-two thousand three hundred and eighty-four in San Francisco.

LARRY. I'm big there, too.

MISS CREWS. Twenty-six thousand eight hundred and seventy-five in Detroit.

BENSON. (to C.F.) And you sit there and tell me Happy isn't worth thirty-five hundred a week?

C.F. But, Benson, be reasonable. I can't go to B.K. with any such fantastic figure.

BENSON. (sighing) Read that list again, Miss Crews.

C.F. Never mind, Miss. Crews.

LARRY. What about me? Wandering Hearts was my picture, wasn't it? Folks came to see me. They didn't come to see Happy.

BENSON. (taking "Variety" from his pocket) Let me read "Variety" to the assembled multitude. Wandering Hearts socko in Minneapolis despite Larry Toms . . .

-47-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Boy Meets Girl: Spring Song
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Boy Meets Girl 1
  • Foreword 5
  • Act One 9
  • Act Two 43
  • Scene I-- 45
  • Scene II 47
  • Scene III 66
  • Act Three 82
  • Scene II--In Your Own Home. That Is, If You Have One, and If You Listen to the Radio. 94
  • Scene III--Mr. Friday's Office, the Following Day. Mr. Friday Is Sitting at His Desk, Dictating to Miss Crews. 95
  • Spring Song 109
  • To Sara and Rose 111
  • Foreword 113
  • Scenes 116
  • Act One 118
  • Act Two 152
  • Act Three 188
  • Act Three 210
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 220

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.