Boy Meets Girl: Spring Song

By Bella Cohen Spewack; Samuel Spewack | Go to book overview

ACT THREE

SCENE TWO

SCENE--Evening. Several months later. The same room. The room is in half light. Behind the green rope portières can be seen the outlines of a bed. . . . It is only partly visible. MRS. SOLOMONis bending over it. TILLIE is sitting at table half asleep. The room bespeaks a long vigil. Outside, a radio continues with its relentless brass and chatter.

MRS. SOLOMON. Florrie, you mustn't sleep. You must try and stay awake, darling--Florrie--Florrie-- (WOMAN enters from bedroom, buttoning her blouse.)

WOMAN. (to TILLIE) A very nice baby. I wish it was mine! Ah, but I only get boys. I never get a girl. (She crosses to MRS. SOLOMON) And how is the little momma? . . . (Looks) She's still sleeping, Mrs. Solomon?

MRS. SOLOMON. (looking at WOMAN distractedly) It's not good, huh? She shouldn't sleep, huh?

WOMAN. Of course, I can't say--but I think she's sleeping too much. But it's different in different cases. . . .

I'll be back after supper.

TILLIE. Thanks, Mrs. Birnbaum.

WOMAN. Go in and see that baby, Tillie. I nursed her good, and now she's sleeping like a little princess. It's a good thing I have enough for two. (She exits. TILLIE moves slowly to bedroom and stops at door, looks into it. Silence, save for the blaring radio.)

MRS. SOLOMON. (rises) It's no use. I'll have to go down and ask him to stop it. I can't stand it. There's

-210-

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Boy Meets Girl: Spring Song
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Boy Meets Girl 1
  • Foreword 5
  • Act One 9
  • Act Two 43
  • Scene I-- 45
  • Scene II 47
  • Scene III 66
  • Act Three 82
  • Scene II--In Your Own Home. That Is, If You Have One, and If You Listen to the Radio. 94
  • Scene III--Mr. Friday's Office, the Following Day. Mr. Friday Is Sitting at His Desk, Dictating to Miss Crews. 95
  • Spring Song 109
  • To Sara and Rose 111
  • Foreword 113
  • Scenes 116
  • Act One 118
  • Act Two 152
  • Act Three 188
  • Act Three 210
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