Higher Education for Business

By Robert Aaron Gordon; James Edwin Howell | Go to book overview

chapter 14
THE BUSINESS FACULTY

THE EXPANSION in the student population has already outrun the ability of the business schools to find qualified teachers. In the absence of strong and positive action, the worst of the faculty shortage is yet to come. In recognition of this fact, the AACSB sponsored a conference in 1955, the proceedings of which have been widely read and discussed.1 As a result there has come to be a greatly increased awareness of the seriousness of the problem, and some steps have been taken to cope with it.

But as serious as this quantitative problem is, the issue of quality is even more important. Indeed, the two are inseparably connected. One answer to the faculty shortage--the inevitable answer in the absence of positive measures--is increasing reliance on inadequately qualified teachers. One of the most important issues facing the business schools is how, in the face of the pressures created by mounting enrollments, they can not only maintain but improve the quality of their faculties. Without such improvement, the higher standards of business education proposed in this report are not likely to be attained.


Characteristics of Business Faculties

More than 10,000 persons were engaged in 1956 in teaching one or more business courses in a college or university.2 About 60 per cent of these were regular, full-time faculty members of schools or departments of business. The remainder were employed part-time in either day, evening, or extension programs.

Part-time instruction may create relatively few problems when it is used for specialized, nondegree courses offered as a service to the community. It is only natural that such courses, which can provide valuable supplementary training for those already in business, be offered by practicing specialists. The serious problems arise when part-time instructors are used extensively in the regular degree offerings of a school. Such in-

____________________
1
The proceedings were published as Faculty Requirements and Standards in Collegiate Schools of Business ( AACSB, 1955).
2
The Carnegie Corporation Survey of Business Education, Summary of Preliminary Findings (revised August 1, 1958), is, unless otherwise specified, the source for most of the figures cited in the remainder of this chapter on the size and characteristics of business faculties.

-341-

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