Higher Education for Business

By Robert Aaron Gordon; James Edwin Howell | Go to book overview

chapter 18
SOME FINAL SUGGESTIONS

A PARTIAL summary of our findings has already been provided in Chapter 7. In that chapter we considered the educational implications of the analysis of business competence attempted in Part II, and we described the direction in which, in our opinion, collegiate business education should seek to move in the years ahead. The recommendations offered in Chapter 7 were then elaborated in considerable detail in Part III, dealing with curriculum, and in Part IV, which was concerned with students, faculty, teaching, and research.

The general tenor of our recommendations was that the business schools (and departments of business) need to move in the direction of a broader and more rigorous educational program, with higher standards of admission and student performance, with better informed and more scholarly faculties that are capable of carrying on more significant research, and with a greater appreciation of the contributions to be made to the development of business competence by both the underlying non- business disciplines and the judicious use of clinical materials and methods.

In this final chapter, we propose to consider some of the implications of our recommendations and to suggest some things that might be done to implement them. The years immediately ahead offer an unusual opportunity for significant reform throughout business education. The business schools will not be alone if they insist on higher standards; there is an increased awareness nationally of the need for more rigor both at and before the collegiate level; and, perhaps most important of all, enrollments are rising rapidly. All this means that substantial reform will entail fewer problems of adjustment than might otherwise be expected.


The Need for Further Study and Appraisal

We still know too little about the kinds of qualities that make for success in business and other administrative careers and in what ways formal education can most effectively contribute to the development of managerial competence. We have made use of such information as was available and have attempted to contribute some additional evidence of our

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