Old Tippecanoe: William Henry Harrison and His Time

By Freeman Cleaves | Go to book overview

XXIII
HARRISON VERSUS VAN BUREN

GRANGER for vice president won sanction in Indiana but Maryland nominated Harrison and John Tyler. The South had no particular interest in Anti-Masonry. Granger represented a political trend which was merging with abolitionism.

The nomination of Tyler, a states' rights man who had supported South Carolina's nullification idea, showed clearly the divergence in Whig ranks. A Richmond paper, remarking upon the Harrisburg nomination, rejoiced that the "ultra federalists . . . and a half score disappointed anti-masons" had seceded from the Harrison ticket but paid no attention to Granger. 1 Friends of John Tyler, the ruling choice in the South, hopefully turned to Ohio where state Whigs were to meet on Washington's birthday. Should Tyler be successful in breaking into the Granger phalanx in the Northwest the New Yorker might be induced to withdraw.

Such at least was the hope of Tyler's supporters. Others regarded as unfeasible a national ticket containing the names of two men, two native Virginians, of states' rights and slavery principles. And of course Henry Clay's wishes had to be taken into account. Clay preferred Granger to Tyler, or so the word was passed in Ohio where the Kentuckian's influence was still strong. With Harrison committed to a single term, supporters of Tyler believed that Clay was working to prevent the emergence of any rival Whig who might become eligible for the presidency four years hence. 2 In this one particular Granger was considered no threat.

February 22, 1836, the largest political convention ever held in the western country met in the public square at Columbus. A great ox, weighing 3375 pounds, was divided among delegates numbering 1064 strong. 3 After considerable fanfare and oratory outdoors the delegates hired a theater and settled down to business. Clay men argued that should Ohio fail to sustain the Pennsylvania nomination the Whig cause would be injured, perhaps lost. The financial measures of Jackson's administration were attacked, General Harrison's

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Old Tippecanoe: William Henry Harrison and His Time
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • ACKNOWLEDGMENT vii
  • THE HARRISON FAMILY ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • I- Colonel Ben Harrison 1
  • II- Student of War 9
  • III- Delegate to Congress 22
  • IV- A New Frontier 33
  • V- Two Shawnee Brothers 51
  • VI- The Treaty of Fort Wayne 61
  • VII- quickening of War 69
  • VIII- The March Up the Wabash 83
  • IX- Tippecanoe 98
  • X- Kentucky Crosses the Ohio 112
  • XI- Massacre at the River Raisin 132
  • XII- A Fort is Built 151
  • XIII- The Siege of Fort Meigs 162
  • XIV- "We Have Met the Enemy . . ." 172
  • XV- Victory in Canada 188
  • XVI- The Hero of the Thames 206
  • XVII- Harrison Resigns 216
  • XVIII- Harrison Asks Congress to Judge 229
  • XIX- Political Fortunes 243
  • XX- South American Adventure 261
  • XXI- Depression Years 276
  • XXII- Evolution of a Candidate 288
  • XXIII- Harrison versus Van Buren 301
  • XXIV- Tippecanoe and Tyler Too 314
  • XXV- Jubilation and Mourning 329
  • Notes 345
  • Bibliography 392
  • Index 403
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