Where Eagles Land: Planning and Development of U.S. Army Airfields, 1910-1941

By Jerold E. Brown | Go to book overview

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS

While undertaking this study, I have incurred many debts. I would like to thank all of those who helped, even though I cannot name them individually. I especially thank the United States Air Force and the Office of Air Force History for the fellowship that made possible the extensive research necessary for this study. A grant from the Southern Regional Education Board made additional research possible.

The staff of the Simpson Historical Research Center deserves my warmest thanks for the many documents they retrieved and declassified for my use. Likewise, the staff of the National Archives provided the most prompt and helpful service during my visits there. The staff of Perkins Library at Duke University, especially the personnel in Inter-Library Loan and Public Documents, assisted in innumerable ways. My visits to the Indiana State Library and Archives in Indianapolis, the United States Air Force Museum Archives at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, and the Museum of Armour and Cavalry at Fort Knox were all rewarding, thanks to the timely assistance of staff members at each location. Special thanks go to W.A.B. Douglas, Director of History for the Canadian Department of National Defense, for forwarding to me a number of documents from the Public Records Office in Ottawa.

Among those individuals I must mention are Professor Lawrence Gelfand of the University of Iowa, Professor Gerald Linderman at the University of Michigan, and Don Gilmore of the Combat Studies Institute who read various parts of my manuscript and made many helpful suggestions. Professor I. B. Holley, Jr., provided much valid criticism and many insights that significantly enhanced this study. Finally, to Professor Theodore Ropp I owe my deepest gratitude for his guidance and friendship. For all errors and omissions, I am fully responsible.

-xi-

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Where Eagles Land: Planning and Development of U.S. Army Airfields, 1910-1941
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Illustrations vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - A Solid Footing 1
  • 2 - Plans, Parade Grounds, and Politics 15
  • 3 - The First Test 35
  • 4 - The Lean Years 53
  • 5 - A New Beginning 73
  • 6 - Plans, Politics, and Air Bases 93
  • 7 - Air Bases, Plans, and Preparations 115
  • 8 - Planning for the Future 139
  • Notes 143
  • Selected Bibliography 183
  • Index 209
  • About the Author 221
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