Acknowledgements

This survey of Ozark folk culture neither touches on every aspect of Ozark folklore nor covers any facet of the topic in great depth or detail. Instead, this brief examination is an attempt to show the breadth and diversity of Ozark folklore. Far from being a relatively simple, static phenomenon, Ozark folk culture, like that of any region, is complex and is constantly in a state of flux. In the sense of a uniform set of traditions followed by everyone in this mountain region, there is no such thing as Ozark folklore. Paradoxically, everyone in the Ozarks has folk traditions that are kept alive and transformed into newly evolving lore. Contrary to some popular stereotypes, it is not just the elderly who participate in these activities.

It is commonplace for folklore, Ozark or otherwise, to be accompanied by remarks about how the material has been collected from the last people who are keeping the traditions alive. My hope is that the following pages will show that such morbidity is unwarranted--that folklore is not only alive in the Ozarks but is flourishing there. It is true that some items pass out of existence, but others arise to take their place. For at least two hundred years the death of folklore has been predicted, but the subject refuses to die and seems unlikely to in the foreseeable future.

Ozark folklore provides solid evidence that, while the Ozarks has for much of its human history been geographically isolated, it has not been culturally isolated. Instead, like people everywhere, Ozarkers have been influenced by the culture of other areas, particularly by that of southern Appalachia. But traditions from elsewhere have not just been slavishly copied; they have been translated into similar, yet new, forms. That is why, culturally speaking, the Ozarks is not Appalachia West or, for that matter, a carbon copy of any other region.

It would be desirable but impossible to list every person who has influenced my thinking on Ozark culture. I will mention here only those who specifically contributed to the present book. These include Desmond Walls Allen, Sarah Brown, James Denny, Gerald Dupy, Robert K. Gilmore, Bob Hammack, James Johnston, Gordon McCann, William McCarthy, Lynn Morrow, Phyllis Rossiter, Barbara Wehrman, and George West. They are, of course, in no way to be held responsible for interpretations.

-xi-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Ozark Country
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • FOLKLIFE IN THE SOUTH SERIES ii
  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgements xi
  • Introduction xiii
  • Chapter 1 Historical Overview 1
  • Chapter Family Ties 17
  • Chapter 3 at Work 51
  • Chapter 4 Folk Customs 75
  • Chapter 5 Ozark and Appalachian Folk Music 97
  • Chapter 6 Games and Entertainment 131
  • Chapter 7 Folk Narratives 151
  • Appendix 167
  • Notes 173
  • Bibliographical Essay 181
  • Bibliography 185
  • Index 189
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 194

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.