Que. And all this safely?

Rox. And all this safely? I by this hand will I, Or else would I might never doe any thing to purpose; If he have but the first part of a young gentleman in him. Tis granted Madam; I have crotchets in my braine That you shall see him and enjoy him, and he not know where he is, nor who it is.

570

Que. How? shall he not know me?

Rox. Why tis the least part of my meaning he should Lady. Doe you thinke you could possibly be safe and he know you? Why some of your yong Gallants are of that vaine-glorious and preposterous Humour, that if they lay with their owne Sisters you should heare them prate of't, This is too usuall, there's no wonder in't: what I have sayd I will sweare to performe, you shall enjoy him ere night And he not know you next morning.

580

Que. Thou art not onely necessary but pleasing, There, catch our bounty, mannage all but right, As now with gold, with honours weele requite. Exit.

Rox. I am your creature Lady; pretty gold, And by this light me thinkes most easily earn'd, There's no faculty, say I like a Pander, and that makes so many Now adayes dye in the Trade: I have your gold Lady, And eke your service; I am one step higher, This office makes a gentleman a Squire. Exit.

590

II. i


Act. 2.

Scene. 1.

Enter Clowne, and two Sheapheards.

Shep. 1. Come fellow Coridon, are the pits digg'd?

Clo. I, and as deepe as an Vsurers conscience I warrant thee.

Shep. 2. Mas and that's deepe enough, 'twill devoure a widdow and three Orphans At a breakefast; soft, is this it?

600

Shep. 1. I, I, this is it.

II. ii

____________________
C 2 Clo.

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The Bloody Banquet: A Tragedie
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • LIST OF IRREGULAR AND DOUBTFUL READINGS ix
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  • THE BLOODIE BANQVET. A TRAGEDIE. *
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