Rox. Oh sir, first try me,

But we protract? good houres, come follow me sir, Why this is right your sportive Gallants prize, Before they'le loose their sport theyle loose their eyes. Exeu.

1010

III. ii


Scen. 2.

Enter the Queene and foure servants, she with a booke in her hand.

Que. Oh my feare-fighting blood! are you all here.

Ser. 1. All at your pleasure Madam.

Que. That's my wish, and my opinion

Hath ever beene perswaded of your truthes, And I have found you willing t'all imployments We put into your charge.

1020

Ser. 2. In our faith's madam.

Ser. 3. For we are bound in duty to your Bounty.

Que. Will you to what I shall prescribe sweare secrecie?

Ser. 4. Try us, sweete Lady, and you shall prove our faith's.

Que. To all things that you heare or see

I sweare you all to secrecie; I poure my life into your brests, There my doome or safety rests. If you prove untrue to all Now I rather chuse to fall With losse of my desire, than light Into the Tyrants wrathfull spight: But in vaine I doubt your trust, I never found your hearts but just. On this booke your vowes arrive, And as in truth in favour thrive.

1030

Omn. We wish no higher, so we sweare.

Que. Like Jewels all your vowes Ile weare.

Here, take this Paper, there those secrets dwell, Goe reade your charge, which I should blush to tell. All's sure, I nothing doubt of safety now,

1040

III.iii 1050

____________________
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The Bloody Banquet: A Tragedie
Table of contents

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  • Title Page iii
  • LIST OF IRREGULAR AND DOUBTFUL READINGS ix
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  • THE BLOODIE BANQVET. A TRAGEDIE. *
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