To which each servant hath combin'd his vow. Roxano, that begins it trustily, I cannot chuse but prayse him, he's so needfull, There's nothing can be done about a Lady But he is for it; honest Roxano; Even from our head to feete he's so officious, The time drawes on, I feele the minutes here, No clocke so true as love that strikes in feare. Exeunt.

III.iii 1050


Scene. 3.

Soft musicke, a Table with lights set out. Arras spread. Enter Roxano leading Tymethes. Mazeres meetes them.

Tym. How farre lacke I yet of my blind pilgrimage?

Maz. Whist, Roxano!

Rox. You are at your--In my Lord, away, Ile helpe You to a disguise.

Maz. Enough. Exit.

Tym. Me thinkes I walke in a Vault all under ground.

Rox. And now your long loft eyes againe are found: good morrow sir. Puls off the hood.

1060

Tym. By the masse the day breakes.

Rox. Rest here my Lord and you shall finde content, Catch your desires, stay here, they shall be sent.

Tym. Though it be night, tis morning to that night which brought me hither,

Ha! the ground spread with Arras? what place is this? Rich hangings? faire roome gloriously furnish'd? Lights and their luster? riches and their splendor? Tis no meane creatures, these dumbe tokens witnesse; Troth I begin t' affect my Hostesse better; I love her in her absence, though unknowne, For courtly forme that's here observ'd and showne.

1070

Loud musicke. Enter 2. with a Banquet; other 2. with lights; they set 'em downe and depart, making obeysance. Roxanotakes one of them aside.

IV. i.

____________________
Rox

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The Bloody Banquet: A Tragedie
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • LIST OF IRREGULAR AND DOUBTFUL READINGS ix
  • Title Page *
  • THE BLOODIE BANQVET. A TRAGEDIE. *
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