The Foundations of Ohio - Vol. 1

By Beverley W. Bond Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER I
The Ohio Country

AMONG the many colorful episodes that marked the westward sweep of civilization across the American continent, one of the most dramatic and significant was the exploration and settlement of the Ohio country. The term, Ohio country, may be defined as approximately that area, bounded by the Ohio and Allegheny rivers on the east and the south, by Lake Erie and the Maumee Valley on the north, and by the Miami and Auglaize valleys on the west. With certain minor adjustments of these boundaries, the Ohio country developed from a primitive wilderness into the State of Ohio with its 40,740 square miles. In the course of this notable transformation many important influences were at work which determined the future of the Ohio country itself, and had a profound effect as well upon the progress of the American nation. Indeed, aside from the particular advantages it held out to the would-be settler, the Ohio region was a veritable gateway between the expanding population east of the Appalachians, and the vast stretches of vacant land in Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Wisconsin, and across the Mississippi.

In the stupendous cavalcade of the Ohio country, first came the aboriginal inhabitants, the all but mythical Mound-builders, and then the Indians. Not until the seventeenth century did Europeans find their way here in the persons of the French fur traders and missionaries, who had pushed westward from their settlements in Canada along the St. Lawrence. Exploring the southern shore of Lake Erie, and the Ohio Valley, probably as far as the Falls at Louisville, they marked out first the bare outlines of the Ohio region. Meanwhile the English were absorbed in their far-flung task of occupying and developing the Atlantic Coast, and only a few exceptionally hardy adventurers penetrated the Appalachian

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The Foundations of Ohio - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editor''s Introduction v
  • Table of Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • List of Maps xiii
  • Editor''s Introduction to Volume I xv
  • Preface xvii
  • Chapter I- The Ohio Country 3
  • Chapter II- The Ohio Aborigines 34
  • Chapter III- The Coming of the French 60
  • Chapter IV- The English Advance 87
  • Chapter V- The French vs. the English 115
  • Chapter VI- The Final Struggle 141
  • Chapter VII- The English in Control 165
  • Chapter VIII- The British vs. the Americans 200
  • Chapter IX- The Americans Triumphant 238
  • Chapter X- The First Settlements 275
  • Chapter XI- The Indian Wars 312
  • Chapter XII- The Spread of Settlement 349
  • Chapter XIII- The Beginnings of Government 396
  • Chapter XIV- The First Fruits of the Ordinance 437
  • Index 477
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