The Foundations of Ohio - Vol. 1

By Beverley W. Bond Jr. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VIII
The British vs. the Americans

SCARCELY was Dunmore's War ended when the mounting dissatisfaction with the mother country reached a climax in open conflict at Lexington and Concord, April 19, 1775. The colonies were now arrayed against the entire British Empire, rather than England alone, and so far as the Ohio country was concerned, the conflict was a clear-cut struggle for supremacy between the British in nominal control and the advancing Americans. The situation was strikingly similar to the one during the French and Indian War. Like the English in 1754, the Americans in 1775 based their power upon Fort Pitt and the near-by region, while the British, like the French in the earlier war, had their headquarters at Detroit, and controlled the Wabash Valley and the Illinois settlements. Between these centers of British and American power were the Ohio tribes, with each side striving to win their friendship, and the odds favoring the British who, in addition to their long-time alliance with the Iroquois, controlled the Great Lakes and the Wabash Valley. A forecast of the Ohio Valley was the resolution adopted by Lord Dunmore's officers, November 5, 1774, at Fort Gower near the mouth of the Hocking, pledging their utmost efforts "for the defense of American liberty, and for the support of her just rights and privileges."1

The British faced many difficult problems in holding Detroit at so great a distance from their main base in Canada.2 In April, 1776, there were only 120 men in the garrison, and the approximately 350 untrained militia at Detroit, chiefly French habitants,

____________________
1
American Archives; prepared by Peter Force ( Washington, 1837-53), ser. 4, I, 953.
2
Additional MSS., 21,764; A. O., 1.376.1; War Office Papers (in British Public Records Office; hereafter cited W. O.), 28.6; R. G. Thwaites and L. P. Kellogg, eds., Revolution on the Upper Ohio, 1775-1777 ( Madison, Wis., 1908), 149-51.

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The Foundations of Ohio - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Editor''s Introduction v
  • Table of Contents ix
  • List of Illustrations xi
  • List of Maps xiii
  • Editor''s Introduction to Volume I xv
  • Preface xvii
  • Chapter I- The Ohio Country 3
  • Chapter II- The Ohio Aborigines 34
  • Chapter III- The Coming of the French 60
  • Chapter IV- The English Advance 87
  • Chapter V- The French vs. the English 115
  • Chapter VI- The Final Struggle 141
  • Chapter VII- The English in Control 165
  • Chapter VIII- The British vs. the Americans 200
  • Chapter IX- The Americans Triumphant 238
  • Chapter X- The First Settlements 275
  • Chapter XI- The Indian Wars 312
  • Chapter XII- The Spread of Settlement 349
  • Chapter XIII- The Beginnings of Government 396
  • Chapter XIV- The First Fruits of the Ordinance 437
  • Index 477
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