AUTHOR'S PREFACE

MANY years must pass before a definitive life of Lloyd George is published. This book is an interim, unofficial contribution, adapted to a particular series; the author is not a trained historian, but for some years was a civil servant and at that time saw much of Lloyd George. Very modern history, however, Harold Temperley tells us, has generally to be learned from books which are not histories and from writers who are not historians. This outline is drawn from sources available to the public, and from the author's personal knowledge. It traces the career of a significant political innovator who has been much lauded and decried and who has been the subject of violent controversy. For his part in the conduct of the First World War he has written his own defence in his remarkable Memoirs. Some disputed matters are dealt with in the following pages at perhaps disproportionate length in an attempt to clarify the issues involved. I have tried to rid myself of prejudice and partiality but I am not so foolish as to believe that I have succeeded.

My first and greatest obligation is to Mrs. Dorothy E. Forrester, M.A., for every sort of assistance in the preparation of this book. Herself a Welshwoman, she has helped me throughout in drafting, checking, and deleting material, and any merit the book may possess must be largely ascribed to her skill and devotion. I wish to thank her in the most whole-hearted fashion.

Next, I desire to thank the Council of the National Library of Wales for facilities placed at my disposal in the amplest manner, including access to the unpublished Papers of the late D. R. Daniel and Sir Herbert Lewis. The Librarian, Sir William Davies, and his staff never failed to respond to the demands made upon their kindness and knowledge. I am under obligations also to Mr. R. O. Roberts, M.A., and Mr. I. G. John, M.A.

Every writer on Lloyd George in relation to the War of 1914-18 and to the Conferences which followed must constantly turn, as I have gratefully done, to his War Memoirs and Peace Treaties.

To those who have written books or articles from which I have quoted, or have given me advice, I am indebted, and if I have failed to acknowledge them in the text I desire to do so in this place. To

-ix-

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Lloyd George
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • EDITOR'S PREFACE vii
  • AUTHOR'S PREFACE ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • I - PREPARATION 1863-89 1
  • II - MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT 1890-1906 13
  • III - CABINET MINISTER 1906-14 33
  • V - PRIME MINISTER IN WAR 1916-18 88
  • VI - PRIME MINISTER IN PEACE 1918-22 165
  • VII - IN OPPOSITION 1923-45 207
  • VIII - THE MAN SPEAKER AND WRITER 262
  • Bibliography 291
  • Index 305
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