I
PREPARATION 1863-89

WALES

THE greatest Welshman whom that unconquerable race has produced since the age of the Tudors--this was the verdict on Lloyd George pronounced in Parliament two days after his death by the Prime Minister, Winston Churchill. It was fitting that this tribute should have been paid in the Chamber where in former days Lloyd George's oratory had roused the Commons, stirring some to a frenzy of admiration, others to a frenzy of anger. Fitting also that it was paid by the only parliamentarian and leader of his day comparable to him in stature and achievement. They were lifelong friends; in turn they led the nation through a world war; both had seen their efforts crowned with victory. Contrasted in the circumstances of birth and education, each in the hour of need proved to be the saviour of his country.

It is in the direction of his ancestry and childhood that we may find some clue to the personality whose character and career we are about to trace through eighty-two years of ceaseless activity. Had Lloyd George remained in the populous city of his birth he would still have challenged his fate with courage and been as impatient of frustration as he later proved to be; but had he missed the rich intimacies of village life and the training of a remarkable uncle he might not have grown into the unmistakable Welshman, intolerant of injustice and oppression, famous throughout the world.

The parents of David Lloyd George spent three months in Manchester, and there he was born on 17 January 1863, at 5 New York Place. His father, William George, was the son of a well-to-do Pembrokeshire farmer, but, because of his intellectual bent, preferred the teaching profession to farming. He seems to have been of a roving, restless disposition, and before going to Manchester he had held posts in London, Liverpool, Haverfordwest, Pwllheli, and Newchurch. While at Pwllheli he had met and

-1-

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Lloyd George
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • EDITOR'S PREFACE vii
  • AUTHOR'S PREFACE ix
  • Contents xi
  • Illustrations xiii
  • I - PREPARATION 1863-89 1
  • II - MEMBER OF PARLIAMENT 1890-1906 13
  • III - CABINET MINISTER 1906-14 33
  • V - PRIME MINISTER IN WAR 1916-18 88
  • VI - PRIME MINISTER IN PEACE 1918-22 165
  • VII - IN OPPOSITION 1923-45 207
  • VIII - THE MAN SPEAKER AND WRITER 262
  • Bibliography 291
  • Index 305
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