Visions and Revisions of Eighteenth-Century France

By Christine Adams; Jack R. Censer et al. | Go to book overview

Notes on Contributors
CHRISTINE ADAMS is assistant professor at St. Mary's College of Maryland. Her research and publications in the area of family and gender history in pre- and postrevolutionary France explore the history of familial relations, class, and social identity. In 1995, she received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to study the Society of Maternal Charity of nineteenth-century France.
LENARD BERLANSTEIN is professor of history at the University of Virginia. His work has ranged over the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries in France, and includes studies of the professional classes in The Barristers of Toulouse in the Eighteenth Century ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1975) and the working classes in The Working People of Paris, 1871-1914 ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1984) and Big Business and Industrial Conflict in Nineteenth-Century France: A Social History of the Paris Gas Company ( Berkeley and Los Angeles: University of California Press, 1991). He has recently turned his attention to gender history and the history of French theater women from the Old Regime to the finde-siècle.
JACK CENSER is professor of history at George Mason University. After first studying the revolutionary press in Prelude to Power: The Parisian Radical Press, 1789-1791 ( Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1976), Censer has published widely in the history of the Old Regime press. His most recent book, The French Press in the Age of Enlightenment ( New York: Routledge, 1994), is an attempt at synthesis in this dynamic area of research.
HARVEY CHISICK teaches history at the University of Haifa in Israel. One of the first historians to approach the Enlightenment "from below," his publications include The Limits of Reform in the Enlightenment: Attitudes Toward the Education of the Lower Classes in Eighteenth-Century France

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