ACKNOWLEDGMENT

SINCE THE DAY, some ten years ago, when Professor Arthur M. Schlesinger, Sr., spoke of the need for a biography of Woodrow Wilson suitable for his students, I have sought the aid of many men in the writing of one that would serve that purpose and interest other readers as well. The response has been generous and stimulating.

Professor Allan Nevins gave advice and encouragement at a time when the drawing together of the threads of research seemed a task almost insuperable. Stewart Mitchell, Director of the Massachusetts Historical Society, read the manuscript and offered constructive criticism. Certain chapters have been read and criticized by Helen Woodrow Bones, Louis Brownlow, Homer S. Cummings, Marjorie Brown King, Eleanor Wilson McAdoo, Bliss Perry, Sir William Wiseman, Professor Harvey Wish, and Robert W. Woolley.

My debt to President Emeritus Charles Seymour, who many years ago quickened my interest in history by his lectures, has been compounded by the patient and stimulating criticism that he has given freely.

The Woodrow Wilson Foundation has made it possible for me to extend my research and to have necessary secretarial assistance. Mrs. Julie d'Estournelles, Executive Director of the Foundation, has been most helpful in introducing me to the books and pamphlets collected by that organization.

My obligations to those who assisted me in the various libraries in which I have delved are too numerous to detail. The constant solicitude of Mrs. Zara Powers of the Yale University Library and of Laura E. Turnbull, Dr. Henry L. Savage, Alexander P. Clark, and Julie Hudson of the Princeton University Library was invaluable in exploring the large collections relating to Wilson in those institutions. As to Ray Stannard Baker and to many other writers, Katharine E. Brand has given help far beyond the call of duty. I am indeed fortunate to have had her guidance in approaching the vast collections in the Library of Congress, and particularly the Ray Stannard Baker Papers and the Wilson Collection itself, to which Mrs. Woodrow Wilson kindly granted access.

-vii-

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