CHAPTER V
FAMILY MAN

THE NOTICEABLE MAN was now president of a great university. The independent critic, the rollicking chum, the heady lover, the wooer of the Muses--all these fell now under the pressure of pastoral responsibility. The eloquent prophecy that had stirred the Princeton constituency would have to be tempered by tact and patience; for as the servant-leader of an academic community he must concern himself not only with principles but with men of many kinds--those whom he had to love as well as those whom he liked to love.

Soon after coming to Princeton to teach, Wilson had written to his father: "My mind cannot give me gratification. I know it too well and it is a poor thing. I have to rely on my heart as the sole source of contentment and happiness, and that craves, oh, so fiercely, the companionship of those I love." In the early nineties, in a house that the Wilsons rented on Library Place, there had been time to revel in the love of kin and the comradeship of friends. In the absence of shows, automobiles, and country clubs, the college faculty found their recreation in good conversation. And they talked brilliantly: Harry Fine, blunt and hearty, an unwavering disciple of Wilson's educational principles; Jack Hibben, whom the students toasted as "the whitest man in all the fac"; George Harper, authority on beloved Wordsworth; charming Bliss Perry; quizzical Winthrop Daniels; witty President Patton. There were guests, too, from the outside world; Humphry Ward, Walter Hines Page, and Mark Twain. Ellen Wilson arranged that brilliant men and women should come into their drawing room.

When there was occasion to meet strangers, however, Wilson often turned shy and made excuses. Ellen would have to coax him; but, once introduced, he enjoyed himself and dominated the talk. After telling a story he did not chuckle, but fixed a challenging eye on his hearers until they laughed. People who saw Wilson in repose often thought him homely; but once his countenance burst into conversation, they watched his mouth in awe at the precision of the words that came from it. In familiar conversation he was not didactic, and he was utterly candid.

-70-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Woodrow Wilson - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.