CHAPTER VIII
PRINCIPLES, NOT MEN

WITH WILSON'S PLAN for undergraduate quadrangles decently buried, the trustees could give closer attention to constructing the graduate college for which Dean West had been pressing.1

In 1902, after studying graduate work at European universities, West drew up a formal plan for a graduate college that would be so placed that the undergraduates would pass by in their daily walks. This was a scheme close to the heart of Wilson. In his first report to the board, on October 21, 1902, he asked for three million dollars for endowment of a graduate establishment. He told the trustees what he later wrote in a preface for a pamphlet in which West's plan was printed: that the project was one by which "a group of graduate students are most apt to stimulate and set the pace for the whole university." And in his inaugural address Wilson had been even more explicit. The graduate college would be built, he said, "not apart, but as nearly as may be at the very heart, the geographical heart, of the university; and its comradeship shall be for young men and old, for the novice as well as for the graduate." During his years at the Johns Hopkins Graduate School, as student and as lecturer, Wilson had seen the advantage that came to both undergraduates and graduate students from close association outside the classroom. The younger men caught something of the serious intent of the professional scholar, and the graduates were saved from scornful misunderstanding of the men whom they were preparing to teach.

The board of trustees had not formally adopted the proposals made in West's pamphlet and approved by Wilson. The president's drive for funds for the preceptorial system, which West supported heartily, had made it impossible for the dean to make rapid headway until, in 1905-- the year after Grover Cleveland became chairman of the trustees' committee on the graduate school--West finally accumulated resources

____________________
1
The trustees, acting upon a faculty report signed by Wilson in 1896, recognized a graduate residence as "of the first importance for the organization and development of the graduate work." Memorial to the trustees, Dec. 10, 1896, from a faculty committee appointed by Patton and including Wilson but not West.

-116-

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