CHAPTER XXIV
CARRYING ON ALONE

THE AMERICAN people were as astonished as their President by the outbreak of fighting in Europe. Hating no other nation, innocent of any thought of making war, and defended from attack by the Atlantic Ocean, they could not understand such lusts and fears as those that possessed the Old World.

Once hostilities had begun, however, and the quilt of innocence that had covered the minds of Americans was torn apart, prejudices surged up that had lain more or less dormant. Old bias against imperial Britain, fanned by citizens of Irish and German blood, began to glow again. The Hohenzollerns, who by commercial and naval aggressiveness had made themselves hobgoblins in the American Dream, now took on the menace of ogres.

The press of the nation gave vent immediately to emotional pressures that had been building up. Editors reflected feelings of affection for France, sympathy for the gallant underdogs--Belgium and Serbia --distrust of colossal Russia, and resentment toward a Kaiser who was reported once to have said to his troops: "Be terrible as Attila's Huns."

Contemplating the eddying of opinion in the first dark days of August, Wilson was swayed neither by journalists nor by politicians. Six months before war broke out, the President had given warning, in a press conference, that newspapers could do "a vast deal of damage" by printing speculations on foreign affairs. He was confident that he intuitively understood the temper of the American people better than editors and publishers who had criticized his New Freedom and scorned his Mexican policy of watchful waiting.

Financial magnates looked to the White House for reassurance; and Wilson was not displeased to feel that he could be of service to men who had thought him an impractical college president. When the impact of the war made the custodians of private capital shrink into their shells, he felt that he must safeguard his program of reform. The Clayton Bill was not yet enacted, and the President was by no means sure how this and the income tax and the Federal Reserve Act would

-408-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Woodrow Wilson - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.