CHAPTER XXV A LONELY MAN FINDS A COMRADE

WOODROW WILSON had never in his life been so lonely as in the early months of 1915. He was bereft not only of his Ellen, but of Colonel House, the man who could best counsel him with the sympathy that Wilson found so agreeable in ladies. The Colonel was in Europe, "Miss Margaret" was more interested in concert singing than in the duties of a first lady, and moreover, she and Cousin Helen Bones were too young and inexperienced in public affairs to be comforting confidantes.

Fortunately the President had a masculine friend who, though not competent to share the burdens of state, could minister to him in body and spirit. During the mortal illness of Ellen Wilson, Cary T. Grayson had established himself as a "Dutch uncle" to all the family. Not long after Wilson's inauguration the President had asked this navy surgeon why he, like many others, had not applied for permanent assignment to the White House duty that he was tentatively performing; and Grayson had given an answer that had melted his chief's heart: "I do not think that it would be in good taste." The doctor's tact proved to be as infallible as his droll good humor; and soon Wilson had been moved to say to Secretary Daniels, while laying a hand upon Grayson's arm: "I wish this part of the Navy for my very own."

Noticing that Helen Bones was still grieving for Ellen Wilson and lacked feminine comradeship, the doctor introduced her to an energetic matron who could persuade her to take outdoor exercise. Thus it was that Edith Bolling Galt, who was some fifteen years younger than the President, came into his family. A descendant of Virginia plantation owners and professional men, Edith Bolling had been married to Norman Galt, a Washington jeweler. Before his death, in 1908, her husband had given positions in his store to several of her brothers; and the widow had arranged to have the business carried on and drew from it enough income to live comfortably in the Galt house on Twentieth Street.

To Edith Bolling Galt, Woodrow Wilson had been just another transient in the White House. Dipping into The New Freedom at the urging of a sister, she had asked how such things could possibly be

-426-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Woodrow Wilson - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 438

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.