Rebirth: A Political History of Europe since World War II

By Cyril E. Black; Robert D. English et al. | Go to book overview

of these areas colonial peoples had made important contributions to the war effort, and now they sought the ending of colonial ties as their reward. In seeking to implement this goal they received the open support of the Soviet Union and the tacit blessing of the United States. It may not have been fully recognized in 1945, but the age of Europe's imperial dominance of the world was over. It would take some years, much anguish, and considerable bloodshed before all concerned came to accept this judgment. But in 1945 the verdict was essentially already in.

Europe, battered, destroyed, and disillusioned, lay prostrate under the direct or indirect influence and control of those who held power in Washington and Moscow. Its future seemed bleak, its problems massive, and its spirit one of deep pessimism. Yet, like the phoenix, Europe would rise again from the ashes to new heights of well-being and prosperity. Countries that formerly possessed primarily agricultural economies would industrialize significantly. More highly developed nations would explore the parameters of advanced or even postindustrial society. New patterns of economic and political relationships would be established in the international arena. In domestic politics leaders and parties would test a variety of arrangements in search of the best tools both for facilitating and controlling the scientific and technological revolution. They would also seek ways of dealing with the tensions of modern mass societies whose governments were expected, despite the size of the societies governed, to be responsive to individual concerns. How all this came about and why certain paths were chosen are the central concerns of this volume.


Notes
1
E. Renan, La Réforme Intellectuelle et Morale, as quoted in W. L. Langer, The Diplomacy of Imperialism ( 1935), p. 89.
2
R. Brooke, 1914 and Other Poems ( 1916), p. 11.
3
"It is sweet and proper to die for one's country." The poem is entitled "Dulce et decorum est" and appears in Wilfred Owen, The Collected Poems of Wilfred Owen ( 1964), p. 55. Copyright © 1964 by Chatto and Windus, Ltd. Reprinted by permission of New Directions Publishing Corporation.
4
P. Valéry, Variété ( 1924), pp. 32-33.

Suggested Readings

Armstrong, A., Unconditional Surrender: The Impact of the Casablanca Policy upon World War II ( 1961).

-53-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Rebirth: A Political History of Europe since World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Maps xi
  • Preface xiii
  • Preface to the Second Edition xvii
  • PART ONE - Historical Background 1
  • Chapter One - Europe Triumphant: 1300-1900 3
  • Contents 3
  • Notes 25
  • Suggested Readings 25
  • Chapter Two - Europe in Crisis: 1900-1945 28
  • Contents 28
  • Notes 53
  • Suggested Readings 53
  • PART TWO - The International Scene 55
  • Chapter Three - Europe Divided: 1945-1955 57
  • Contents 57
  • Notes 103
  • Suggested Readings 103
  • Chapter Four - East-West Equilibrium: 1955-1975 105
  • Contents 105
  • Notes 142
  • Suggested Readings 142
  • Chapter Five - A New Europe Emerges 144
  • Contents 144
  • Suggested Readings 197
  • PART THREE - The Nation-States 199
  • Chapter Six - Germany: West and East 201
  • Contents 201
  • Notes 250
  • Suggested Readings 250
  • Chapter Seven - The Soviet Union 252
  • Contents 252
  • Notes 300
  • Suggested Readings 300
  • Chapter Eight - Eastern Europe 303
  • Contents 303
  • Suggested Readings 352
  • Chapter Nine - The United Kingdom 356
  • Contents 356
  • Notes 409
  • Suggested Readings 409
  • Chapter Ten - France 411
  • Contents 411
  • Notes 467
  • Suggested Readings 468
  • Chapter Eleven - Italy and the Vatican 470
  • Contents 470
  • Notes 512
  • Suggested Readings 513
  • Chapter Twelve - The Small States of Western and Northern Europe 514
  • Contents 514
  • Notes 565
  • Suggested Readings 565
  • Chapter Thirteen - The Iberian and Aegean States 569
  • Contents 569
  • Notes 610
  • Suggested Readings 610
  • PART FOUR - Conclusion 613
  • Chapter Fourteen - A New Europe 615
  • Contents 615
  • Suggested Readings 643
  • Chronotogy 647
  • Index 685
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 702

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.